The Detailed Analysis Of Ancient Banyan Trees Of Old Clifton Road, Karachi

TREE PROFILE:
Common Names:
Banyan tree, Indian Fig tree
Scientific Names: Ficus benghalensis
Family: Moraceae
Genus: Ficus
Local Names: Barghad ka darakht, bohr, barh
Origin: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh


These ancient banyan trees have been granted to us in all bountiful ways by nature. This is nearly a perfect test of our being in the right temper of mind and way of life so that anyone who loves trees enough, would know about them in their full glory.

I am talking about these banyan trees of old Clifton in fondness which transforms the continuance of physical spacetime into moments.

I recently came to know about this unique wonder of nature while scrolling down some posts from a Facebook group. The name of the group is In Defence Of Trees. It is Almas Mehmood who first shared these photos entitling old faithful banyan trees of Clifton and then I decided that it’s an ideal time for me to document these marvelous living miracle of nature.

Where these Banyan trees are located?

1. For this, you have to visit Karachi. You can easily locate these Banyan trees at Shahrah-e-Iran road in old Clifton Karachi, Pakistan.

2. It is an area of the city that was developed in the 19th century. It was those days when Henry Bartle Frere was appointed chief commissioner of Sindh. In 1850, he took advantage of the opportunities granted to him of further developing the city.

“It was said that he even pensioned off the dispossessed amirs, improved the harbour at Karachi, where he also established municipal buildings, a museum and barracks, instituted fairs, multiplied roads, canals and schools.”

The banyan trees were planted in abundance along the roadsides initially to please the Hindu community at that time because of their religious affiliation with these trees. It was the time of great mutiny.

What is special about these Banyan Trees?

3. It all happened when Karachi’s Natural Heritage Association decided to take a visionary step due to some concerned reasons.

They intentionally, marked and preserved about 68 banyan trees in the old Clifton area only. Here’s the proof.

Thankfully, I found these additional photos via Twitter while browsing about them.

4. City authorities have declared all banyan trees as protected heritage in order to prevent them from being mercilessly chopped off. Source

There I found out that they even rehabilitated an old banyan tree.

Furthermore, the provincial environment department has started preserving 68 old Banyan trees to protect them from vandalism. Source.

This is a great initiative by the government of Sindh of saving heritage trees from immediate extinction. And in this way giving more power to old trees so that they can thrive in full bloom.

5. Don’t you think it’s an amazing fact that some of these trees are believed to be 100 years old or more?

But unfortunately, now these trees are facing the threat of becoming extinct. The reasons are so many to consider: Some think that this is due to the skyrocketing developmental projects in the area. And some cleverly put all the blame on the negligence of the local community.

The detailed analysis of these ancient banyan trees of Karachi

Now here comes the fun part and my favorite activity of documenting trees.

Picture 1.

At first, if you glance closely at this tree it seems as they have branches almost everywhere. The branches are unusually long and they have a power to grow and spread at great distances.

It’s unfortunate to see this tree in such drastic conditions. Banyans are native to and thrive best in India and Pakistan. These days, variations of the majestic trees can be found almost everywhere in the world.

The best way to care for them is to give them plenty of space and warm, wet, humid weather. It seems that this tree is already enjoying the view but the debris around this tree is worrisome.

This tree has shed an ample amount of green leaves. Why so? They usually shed their leaves in a dormant/ off season when the temperature of the area dramatically drops.

The banyan is a decidous evergreen tree and it doesn’t shed all it’s leaves at the same time.

The term deciduous means it will shed its leaves annually. Evergreen in the sense that the leaves will remain vibrant green even in winter season unlike other autumn trees.

I think when the picture was taken, it might be the autumn season or the end of the winter season as it is partly covered with leaves.

They will regrow their green leaves when the weather warms up. Banyan trees usually shed their leaves in the dry season to retain the moisture.

It is planted near a building, driveway or a street. It can be easily identified by its aerial roots.


Picture 2:

Wow, simply wow! This picture is best to determine at which time of the day it is photographed.

The shadow casts by these trees depend on many factors such as the time of day, location, a particular season, and shape of the trees.

If the sun is to the north of the tree then the shadow will cast on the opposite side of the tree that is to the south.

One of the most attractive aspects of any tree is the shadow it casts. Seeing the shadow its casting say eternity. The hot summer day. Birds are loving the shade. It is 12 o clock when the sun is accurately above the trees. I can be wrong.

It should be noted that the longest shadows occur at the sun rise and sunset. It is hard to determine the time of the day at that angle. But my guess is that it must be noon or afternoon time when the picture has been taken.

I can see a crow nearby. Can you? Here it should be mentioned that some native birds like crow and common myna dispersed the seeds of banyan trees. They are abundantly found near those trees which have a dense canopy.

This trees along the road indicates that they are really in bad postures. The concrete pavement has limited the spread of these trees and they have leaned themselves towards one side because of lack of support.


Picture 3:

The main trunk of this tree is not visible as the aerial roots have grown around the trunk.

Older banyan trees are characterized by aerial prop roots that mature into thick, woody trunks, which can become indistinguishable from the primary trunk with age.

This tree is not laterally spreading over a wide area. The roots have been damaged due to debris and stones.

Ficus benghalensis produces propagating roots which grow downwards as aerial roots. Once these roots reach the ground they grow into woody trunks.

If this tree is given ideal conditions it can easily develop lateral branches and can spread to large distances. This is my favourite banyan tree so far. The tree has already uprooted the pavement. The debris of the fallen leaves has increased the fertility of the soil. It is damp and moist.

The fruits and seeds produced by these tree are eaten by birds such as common myna and crows as they can been seen around.

Rumour has it that the fig seeds which pass through the digestive system of these birds are more likely to germinate and sprout earlier.

Picture 4:

This is a classic example of the strangler fig. The main trunk is somewhere lost in that twirling pattern.

Can you see the prop up roots? Can you locate the common myna nearby?

The hanging branches has decided to curl up around the tree. Sadly some branches have been cut down so that they can’t reach the ground.

Picture 5:

Picture 6:

My heart is bleeding for that tree. The concrete pavement is restricting the growth.

Pictures 5 and 6 are of the same tree. My blind guess.


Picture 7:

Now this tree is like a mini forest of its kind. The banyan tree is right among the largest living trees in the world by canopy coverage. My observation says this tree is the same as in picture 1 but here the picture is taken from the front angle instead of being photographed from the sides.

I am ending this article here because initially my attention is not to write a lengthy post. These are entirely my views, so can be wrong and inaccurate. Thank you for reading, though. Do comment please!

Sources:

Facebook post

Arabnews

About Sir Henry Bartle

The Banyan trees of old Clifton past and possible future/samaa

Banyan trees declared protected heritage in Karachi

Oyeyeah/ Karachi Banyan trees


Lovers of pine

Lovers of pine is a Japanese folktale about two lovers that become two young pine trees by sitting under a shade of an old pine tree.



It happened in ancient times when the capital of Japan was still the city of Nara. (Nara, located around 30 km south of modern Kyoto, was the capital of ancient Japan between 710 and 784 CE.)

There lived a young man named Iratsuko and a girl named Iratsume. They were both very beautiful people which caused many people to gossip about them.

“It would be good if the Iratsuko and Iratsume fell in love,” people would say.

But the two of them didn’t notice each other at all. Iratsuko heard what people were saying but he only waved his hand while Iratsume only smiled as she continued on her way.

One evening while the people of the village were staging a big celebration they gathered in the forest glade and began to sing, dance and compose poems.

Then the young man approached Iratsume.

“Turn to look at me,” he asked her. “You are beautiful, like a young pine. Give me some sign that you love me.”

“Do not befit me to listen to such speeches,” she said blushing. “I confess however that I have loved you for a long time. People noticed us, which lead to conversations which in turn made me curious.”

Then everyone began to eavesdrop on their conversation.

“When are you going to be married?” the people called.

“Leave us in peace. Do not look at us, do not touch us” Iratsuko said with anger as he grabbed the girl by the hand and ran into the forest.

“It’s not like we hurt them,” the people said shaking their head. “We were just happy at their good fortune in finding each other at last.”

The two lovers ran into the woods and sat down under an old pine tree.

“Those people never give you a moment’s peace,” Iratsuko snarled.

“It’s true, people are forever sticking their noses into others business,” Iratsume agreed.

It was dark and quite, with only the moon in the sky for light and the gentle sound of the leaves falling from the trees. The two of them sat up all night by the old pine and didn’t notice that morning had come. When the sun rose over the mountain they looked around, they could hear roosters in the distance and a dog barking.

“Let’s go back to the village,” Iratsuko said, but as he tried to rise he found that he was rooted to the ground.

“I’ll help you!” Iratsume exclaimed, but her feet were rooted to the ground as well.

“What’s happened to us!?” the two lovers exclaimed in surprise.

Meanwhile the rest of the villagers came into the forest to search for Irasuko and Iratsume. And lo and behold at the edge of the woods they found two young pine trees. The people gasped when they saw these pines.

“Look, look! It’s Iratsuko and Iratsume. They have turned into pine trees,” the people cried.

Iratsume and Iratsuko heard this and grew frightened for they realized that they must surely have become pine trees.  So they were now two pine trees at the edge of the forest. Sometimes farmers come into the woods and sit under them while asking, “How are you my pretty Iratsume? And is Iratsuko feeling well?”

That’s when the pine creaks and the pines wave and the tree seems to say. “Again you break our peace! We get no salvation from you. Do not look at us, do not touch us.”

So the farmers sigh and eventually go away. So the pine Iratsume is called “do not look at me,” and the pine Iratsuko is called, “do not touch me.”



Source:

Japanese Fairy Tale

29 interesting facts about Shajarat al-Hayah (Tree of life)

“As the poet said, “only God can make a tree,”
probably because it’s so hard to figure out
how to get the bark on.”

– Woody Allen

1. A lonely tree

There is a tree alone in the middle of a desert in Bahrain, that legitimately stands with its roots deep in the sand.

2. The time forgotten story of Shajarat al Hayah

This tree is locally known to us as the “Shajarat al-Hayah” and its alternative name in English is ” The Tree of Life”.

No one expected this tree to live or survive for such a long period of time, yet it has through God’s Will.

3. The king of desert

The Tree of Life in Bahrain is almost 9.75 meters (32 feet) high. It is called Shajarat al Hayat in its native Arabic language.

It has gone on thriving with the ideal height of 32 feet in the extreme temperatures and lack of freshwater resources. This is why it is known as the king of desert in many parts of the world.

4. It is over 400 years old

It is a Prosopis cineraria tree that is over 400 years old. 

It is an evergreen tree that can grow very well in a harsh climate and is well adapted to arid conditions.

5. It’s roots are 50 meters deep

Its roots are 50 meters deep, which is more than enough to reach the water.

6. The well-developed root system

The root system of this tree is long, deep and well developed, securing a firm footing and allowing it to obtain moisture from the groundwater.

7. It is a Mesquite tree

Its a mesquite tree. They may have one or multiple trunks with a multitude of branches. Its leaves are full of color with a green tint and it is remarkable for being existing for so long.

As one person explained,

“The reason people think its beautiful is because it has no right to be there.”

8. A Hardy, drought-tolerant tree

If we study the properties of this tree to understand it more comprehensively then it is quite evident that this is an extremely hardy, drought-tolerant tree because of its remarkable ability to draw water from the water table through its long taproot system.

9. Availability of water

However, it can also use water in the upper part of the ground, depending upon availability.

10. Ability to switch water resources

The tree can easily and rapidly switch from utilizing one water source to the other.

11. Native trees can grow rapidly and quickly

Mesquite trees can grow quickly and furnish shade and wildlife habitat where other trees will not grow.

12. Regeneration ability

It is also said that such a tree can even regenerate from a piece of root left in the soil.

13. A magical green spot in the desert

This tree of life is surrounded by the sea endless oilfields, and if you witness it from a distance then it appears like a magical green spot in the desert.

14. Low hanging branches to withstand hot winds and dry seasons

The tree has several low hanging branches that spread out in all directions as you can notice from various pictures of this tree. Why it is so? To easily withstand hot winds & dry seasons and shows considerable drought hardiness. 

15. It stabilizes shifting sand dunes

Because of its extensive root system, it stabilizes shifting sand dunes and is also useful as a wind-break. 

16. Folk remedies and uses of this border

It yields pale to yellow colored resin with properties similar to that of gum acacias and can be extracted which is used to make candles and aromatic gums and the seeds of this tree are processed into jams.

 17. Boosting tourism to its peak

It has gradually become a local tourist attraction and is visited by thousands of travelers every year.  

If you want to know why “the tree of life” is still surviving all alone in this oddity. Read more.

18. It is claimed that the closest water resource is about 2 kilometers away

There are many theories regarding how this tree is surviving in isolation with not any close companion. Some scientists claim that it is surviving because of the closest water source is an underground stream about 2 kilometers away.

19. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding

Others assume that it gets its water supply from the breezes from the Persian Gulf. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding.

20. Extracting water from the grains of sand

There is another claim which suggests that it has learned how to extract water from grains of sand. Quite possible.

21. It has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen fixing bacteria

It has a symbiotic relationship with some bacteria that allow it to fix nitrogen in the soil. Hence, improving soil fertility and quality.

22. This area was once considered as the Garden of Eden

According to local inhabitants, there is a belief that this area was once considered as the Garden of Eden. And this myth verifies how the ancient inhabitants started naming it as the tree of life.

23. It is claimed that this tree is protected by Enki, known as a god of water

There are also some decorative beliefs revolving around this Tree of Life. One of them says that the area was once the Garden of Eden, and the tree is growing by some mystical blessing. It is also claimed that it is protected by Enki, a god of water according to the Babylonian and Sumerian religions.

24. This tree was nominated for the New Seven Wonders of Nature

In 2009, the tree was nominated for the New seven wonders of Nature list, but it did not make it to the final.

25. Recently, 500 years old pottery was discovered in the vicinity of the tree

In October 2010, archaeologists unearthed 500-year-old pottery and other artifacts near proximity of the tree.

26. The tree of life was an Acacia planted in 1582

A soil and dendrochronology investigation accomplished in the 1990s concluded that the tree was from the family of Acacia which was planted in 1582.

27. Estimating the age of tree by ring analysis

A soil and tree ring analysis conducted now more than 20 years ago. It was made possible by historian Dr. Ali Akbar Bushiri who concluded that the Tree of Life was planted in 1582 AD.

28. It was Fenced off in 2007

It was fenced off in 2007 after being targeted by vandals. An iron fence has been put around to protect the tree from being worshipped as it is considered sacred for being rumored as to be linked to the Garden of Eden.

29. Bearing the marks of ancient civilization and the wrath of a new era

The tree bears marks of graffiti and extensive damage has been done to it’s branches by vandals and youngsters who carve love messages on it’s trunk to immortalized their love as well.

29 interesting facts about Shajarat al-Hayah (Tree of life)

“As the poet said, “only God can make a tree,”
probably because it’s so hard to figure out
how to get the bark on.”

– Woody Allen

1. A lonely tree

There is a tree alone in the middle of a desert in Bahrain, that legitimately stands with its roots deep in the sand.

2. The time forgotten story of Shajarat al Hayah

This tree is locally known to us as the “Shajarat al-Hayah” and its alternative name in English is ” The Tree of Life”.

No one expected this tree to live or survive for such a long period of time, yet it has through God’s Will.

3. The king of desert

The Tree of Life in Bahrain is almost 9.75 meters (32 feet) high. It is called Shajarat al Hayat in its native Arabic language.

It has gone on thriving with the ideal height of 32 feet in the extreme temperatures and lack of freshwater resources. This is why it is known as the king of desert in many parts of the world.

4. It is over 400 years old

It is a Prosopis cineraria tree that is over 400 years old. 

It is an evergreen tree that can grow very well in a harsh climate and is well adapted to arid conditions.

5. It’s roots are 50 meters deep

Its roots are 50 meters deep, which is more than enough to reach the water.

6. The well-developed root system

The root system of this tree is long, deep and well developed, securing a firm footing and allowing it to obtain moisture from the groundwater.

7. It is a Mesquite tree

Its a mesquite tree. They may have one or multiple trunks with a multitude of branches. Its leaves are full of color with a green tint and it is remarkable for being existing for so long.

As one person explained,

“The reason people think its beautiful is because it has no right to be there.”

8. A Hardy, drought-tolerant tree

If we study the properties of this tree to understand it more comprehensively then it is quite evident that this is an extremely hardy, drought-tolerant tree because of its remarkable ability to draw water from the water table through its long taproot system.

9. Availability of water

However, it can also use water in the upper part of the ground, depending upon availability.

10. Ability to switch water resources

The tree can easily and rapidly switch from utilizing one water source to the other.

11. Native trees can grow rapidly and quickly

Mesquite trees can grow quickly and furnish shade and wildlife habitat where other trees will not grow.

12. Regeneration ability

It is also said that such a tree can even regenerate from a piece of root left in the soil.

13. A magical green spot in the desert

This tree of life is surrounded by the sea endless oilfields, and if you witness it from a distance then it appears like a magical green spot in the desert.

14. Low hanging branches to withstand hot winds and dry seasons

The tree has several low hanging branches that spread out in all directions as you can notice from various pictures of this tree. Why it is so? To easily withstand hot winds & dry seasons and shows considerable drought hardiness. 

15. It stabilizes shifting sand dunes

Because of its extensive root system, it stabilizes shifting sand dunes and is also useful as a wind-break. 

16. Folk remedies and uses of this border

It yields pale to yellow colored resin with properties similar to that of gum acacias and can be extracted which is used to make candles and aromatic gums and the seeds of this tree are processed into jams.

 17. Boosting tourism to its peak

It has gradually become a local tourist attraction and is visited by thousands of travelers every year.  

If you want to know why “the tree of life” is still surviving all alone in this oddity. Read more.

18. It is claimed that the closest water resource is about 2 kilometers away

There are many theories regarding how this tree is surviving in isolation with not any close companion. Some scientists claim that it is surviving because of the closest water source is an underground stream about 2 kilometers away.

19. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding

Others assume that it gets its water supply from the breezes from the Persian Gulf. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding.

20. Extracting water from the grains of sand

There is another claim which suggests that it has learned how to extract water from grains of sand. Quite possible.

21. It has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen fixing bacteria

It has a symbiotic relationship with some bacteria that allow it to fix nitrogen in the soil. Hence, improving soil fertility and quality.

22. This area was once considered as the Garden of Eden

According to local inhabitants, there is a belief that this area was once considered as the Garden of Eden. And this myth verifies how the ancient inhabitants started naming it as the tree of life.

23. It is claimed that this tree is protected by Enki, known as a god of water

There are also some decorative beliefs revolving around this Tree of Life. One of them says that the area was once the Garden of Eden, and the tree is growing by some mystical blessing. It is also claimed that it is protected by Enki, a god of water according to the Babylonian and Sumerian religions.

24. This tree was nominated for the New Seven Wonders of Nature

In 2009, the tree was nominated for the New seven wonders of Nature list, but it did not make it to the final.

25. Recently, 500 years old pottery was discovered in the vicinity of the tree

In October 2010, archaeologists unearthed 500-year-old pottery and other artifacts near proximity of the tree.

26. The tree of life was an Acacia planted in 1582

A soil and dendrochronology investigation accomplished in the 1990s concluded that the tree was from the family of Acacia which was planted in 1582.

27. Estimating the age of tree by ring analysis

A soil and tree ring analysis conducted now more than 20 years ago. It was made possible by historian Dr. Ali Akbar Bushiri who concluded that the Tree of Life was planted in 1582 AD.

28. It was Fenced off in 2007

It was fenced off in 2007 after being targeted by vandals. An iron fence has been put around to protect the tree from being worshipped as it is considered sacred for being rumored as to be linked to the Garden of Eden.

29. Bearing the marks of ancient civilization and the wrath of a new era

The tree bears marks of graffiti and extensive damage has been done to it’s branches by vandals and youngsters who carve love messages on it’s trunk to immortalized their love as well.


Thank you for reading and highlighting my work. I frequently write for trees and think about them in my happy time. Please visit my blog and do comment on my posts for giving me a little dose of encouragement that I rarely receive.


112 Amazing Facts and Quotes About Poplar Tree

Getting behind the trees physical and healing properties and understanding of practical qualities is the key to comprehend their unique character.

An esoteric study of trees in folklore and mythology is essential to understand them more extensively and clearly in order to obtain exclusive benefits from them.

By esoteric study, I suggest naturally gravitating towards the intellectual side of trees and appreciating their uniqueness and individuality to a great extent.

Poplar – A tree for temperance

Let’s know about the mythical meaning of Poplar tree in folklore and mythology by first emphasizing upon their geographical distribution and significance.

The accumulated global knowledge and information on the majestic Poplar trees have a tendency to fill many volumes.

Why poplar is known as a tree for temperance is because of the fact that it provides balance, peace, patience and moderation in everyone’s life.

In New England, Poplars were once considered as a “trash tree” because it is short-lived and not of much used. What is so special about this tree is its remarkable character as the Latin meaning of Populus is people or crowd or a multitude of trees as they usually grow in colonies.

Now let’s summarize the various characteristics of Poplar trees that made them so attractive and beneficial along with their historical meanings and findings in ancient scripts.

A Brief Introduction on Poplar Trees

1. It is the deciduous tree which means it is a flower producing tree from the family Salicaceae. They are wind-pollinated and have flowers that are on catkins.

2. The poplar tree is native to most of the temperate regions of the world.

3. The family Salicaceae is also commonly known around the world as the willow family.

It systematically comprises of 55 genera and 1,000 plus species of deciduous or evergreen shrubs and trees all across the world.

4. The Salicaceae family includes the willows, poplar, aspen trees and cottonwoods to be more certain.

5. There are over 30 different species of the Poplar tree throughout the world.

6. Poplars are best described as fast-growing trees because they grow best along the river-beds and water-rich areas of the world.

7. Poplars are fastigiated which means they grow upwards in a columnar fashion narrowing towards the top.

In other words, they have upright usually clustered branches.

8. The native poplar tree is dioecious which means male and female flowers are found on different individual trees

9. Poplar trees often grow quite tall with different varieties varying between 50 and 160 feet in height.

10. Do you know? Populus nigra or black Poplar trees grows up to 30m in height. The Latin meaning of Populus nigra is “People of the dark.” Interesting, no?

11. Poplar trees need sunny spaces to grow and expand properly.

12. The root systems of the Poplar tree is extremely vigorous and invasive, stretching up to 40 meters.

This means if they are planted in close proximity to houses or ceramic water pipes have the potential to damage the buildings and can break the underground pipes and drainage system.

13. Therefore, some municipalities have passed ordinances banning the planting of poplar trees because of their offensive behaviours.

Poplars and willows are aggressive invaders of disturbed sites, and in certain agricultural and forestry conditions, they are regarded as weeds.

14. Poplar trees prefer moist soil that is slightly acidic.

15. The life span of hybrid poplar trees is between 25 to 50 years. They are usually short-lived trees.

16. The hybrid poplar trees were first described as intercontinental hybrids in 1755 in France.

Now they are recognized as Euroamerican poplars around the world.

17. But it should also be kept in mind that some varieties of Poplars such as eastern cottonwoods generally live for 70 – 100 years old.

They have a tremendous potential to live for 200 to 400 years when provided ideal conditions.

18. The popularity and productivity of these hybrids led to a milestone in modern-day popular culture when the first controlled hybridization of poplar trees was successfully achieved by A. Henry in 1912.

Popular culture is that type of media that have mass accessibility and appeal.

19. Later, Stout and Schreiner began hybridizing poplars at the New York Botanical Garden, the USA in 1933.

Those productive hybrids were experimented worldwide and were introduced in many countries at that time.

Many of them displayed ‘hybrid vigour’, and some are still in use today. Hybrid vigour or heterosis is the term used for those trees that produce proper yields and so is crucial for global food security.

20. The pioneer works of Henry and Stout and Schreiner in 1933 spawned poplar hybridization programmes throughout the world, especially in Europe and Asia.

It is their untiring efforts that made hybrid poplar varieties popular everywhere.

21. Do you know the first formal research institute of poplar breeding and culture was founded in 1937 in Italy.

22. It was at that time in the history when the world was changing after World War 2 which also resulted in the increasing worldwide demand for wood products align with the rising world population growth hastened the spread of fast-growing poplar hybrids to all corners of the world, including China, Pakistan and India.

23. Do you know poplar trees are mostly grown as an ornamental tree in southern Europe or everywhere else in the world.

Do you know? The Lombardy poplar, for example, is the most widely used trees in ornamental landscape plantings throughout the world.

24. Taking care of poplar trees is also manageable as only slight pruning of ornamental poplar trees is needed once a year by removing any dead or diseased part from the tree.

25. Unfortunately, black poplar has gradually become a declining species in the Uk but it is estimated that they still grow well and generously in damp areas, near canals and floodplains.

26. In South Asian countries, Populus deltoids which are also commonly known as Cottonwoods can be planted exclusively near waterlogged areas, along the canals, and as roads defence embankments.

Deltoides means triangular, referring to the leaf shape.

27. Most Poplar trees make cotton (hence, the name cottonwoods) but it is only the female trees that produce it.

Female trees produce a capsule which eventually splits open to disperse numerous small seeds usually attached to cotton-like strands.

28. Poplar is an exotic tree in some countries of South Asia and was introduced in these countries in the mid-1950s.

29. Since then, it has gained popularity in both India and Pakistan due to its miscellaneous uses as a commercial timber tree, trading potential and rapid growth rate associated with these trees.

30. Do you know? Poplar trees are greatly susceptible to termite attacks, causing significant losses to Poplars every year.

31. Therefore, farmers mainly used logs of poplar as bait in termite traps (known as termaps or termite bait system) for biocontrol of termites in crops.

32. Farmers usually cultivate Poplar trees within agricultural fields because it remains leafless during winter months.

This tree has an ability to adjust exceedingly well with most of the agricultural crops grown especially in the winter season.

33. Over time, Poplar trees have become the most popular tree species for agroforestry system throughout the world due to its fast growth rate, easy marketing strategies and various remarkable uses which we will discuss later in detail.

34. Traditionally, farmers grow Lombardy Poplars in linear and block fashion because they act as a windbreak around their agricultural fields along with other tree species to protect against wind erosion.

35. A poplar tree consumes 20 – 30 litre of water every day.

36. It has been observed by botanists that those areas suffer scarcity of water and soil becomes barren with the passage of time wherever Poplar trees have been introduced as an exotic tree species.

37. It has been examined that the water level becomes low and salinity is seen when they are used as an exotic variety.

38. Here, I would like to mention some facts about the famous Pando forest which is made of thousands of Populus tremuloides clones. Incredible no?

39. The other name of Populus tremuloides is trembling Aspen or quaking Aspen which is distinguished by its leaves.

40. Not forgetting about the Pando forest which is actually a colony of an individual male tree Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides).

In other words, it is believed to be a forest of genetically identical trees.

Read more about the extraordinary Pando forest here in detail.

41. Black poplar wood is fine textured, soft and virtually white in colour. It is naturally flexible and resistant to shock due to its water-absorbing quality.

42. Poplar tree represents a reasonable candidate for phytoremediation which is a recent technology to clean up soil, air and water contaminated with hazardous contaminants by using living trees.

Poplar along with the willows are ideal trees for this purpose.

Recordonline.com

43. The Balmville tree which was cut due to safety concerns in 2015 was the oldest eastern cottonwood in the United States.

Read more about this historical tree here which as narrated by the local folklore as the tree grew when George Washington planted his walking stick there.

44. The largest recorded cottonwood tree in the world is the Frimley Park tree located in Hastings, New Zealand. This cottonwood was planted in the 1870s. It measures 42 m tall, 34 m wide and 10.2 m in girth.

45. In the southern hemisphere, the increasing demand for matchwood prompted interest in poplar growing.

46. When China hosted the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, millions of Chinese citizens planted trees to create a better environment for the Games.

Most of these trees were poplars and willows (Beijing Organizing Committee, 2008).

47. Chile has a long history of planting poplars, starting in the mid-19th century; since about 1985, private industry has contributed significantly to sustainable rural development by planting poplars.

48. At about the same time in North America, the Homestead Act of 1862 in the USA and the Dominion Land Act of 1872 in Canada required homesteaders to plant trees and cultivate the soil in exchange for land in the west.

These laws encouraged settlers to plant huge areas of native poplars (and some willows) on the prairies of North America and prompted the formation of shelterbelt programmes in Canada and the USA.

49. Do you know? According to Martin, et al, poplar trees are especially important to the diet of beavers in the Northeast U.S.

American Wildlife and Plants by Martin, Zim, and Nelson cite the following trees as used by beaver in various parts of the U.S.: poplar (cottonwoods and aspens), along with other native trees.

It is generally noted that beavers prefer to cut down those trees that are soft-wooded which in turn, encourages hard-wooded trees such as oaks to receive more sunshine and thrive well.

Poplar trees in folklore and mythology

Traditional Uses of Poplar Trees

50. Native black poplar has a long history of being used for timber as it is a valued natural resource for construction. They are also used to make pallets and plywood.

51. The ancient Romans and Greeks considered the poplar tree as a symbol of protection and endurance.

They honoured these trees by creating shields and shelters from the wood of poplar trees.

52. Do you know the wood of native Poplar trees has natural fire-resistant quality? This made them an ideal competitor for used as floorboards particularly in those days when the use of paraffin (kerosene) lamps was in demand and commonly used in household purposes.

53. Nearly all Poplar tree wood requirement of industry is being fulfilled from farm-grown Poplar trees in many countries of the world.

54. There was a time in the early 1990s when Poplar based agroforestry systems in South Asian countries provide an annual income of Rs 70, 000 to 80,000 per acre (approximately 180 US dollars) which was a huge amount at that time.

55. The bark of poplar trees is used to make tonics to reduce fever and diarrhoea. They are also used as stimulants and blood purifier in some Asian countries.

56. The wood of Populus ciliata is obtained to create the paper for writing, wrapping gifts and printing.

57. The wood of Poplar trees has become an essential raw material for matches and packaging industries.

58. Admired for its shock-absorbing qualities, Poplar trees were used to make boxes, cardboard, crates, carts, and clogs or wooden shoes.

59. The wood of poplar is reckoned for its high elasticity and this made it an ideal choice for the production of snowboards as well as used to make musical instruments such as electric guitars and drums.

60. The leaves of poplar trees have astringent, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory qualities.

The leaves of poplar, when used as a herbal tea, have a cleansing effect on kidneys.

61. Poplar trees produce copious amount of sap in early spring when their production is at its peak.

This sap when utilized properly makes an extraordinary external ointment for bruises.

62. The Balm of Gilead includes Poplar as a component.

Read more about the Balm of Gilead here.

63. There was a time when the wood of Poplar trees was most commonly used for panel paintings in Italy preferred because of its unique colour and texture.

This is the reason most of the early Renaissance Italian arts were painted on Poplar wood including the famous Mona Lisa.

Poplar trees symbolizes eternal life

64. In ancient Rome, it was customary for people to arrange their meetings or gatherings under the shade of Poplar trees.

The poplar was so widely planted at that time that the Roman proposed a title for that tree named as Arbor Populi or tree of the people.

65. Hence, the name Poplar is originated from the Latin or Roman word “Populus” which means people or so many.

66. The poplar tree is linked to people because of the fluttering habit of poplar leaves which in the slightest breeze make a noise likened to talking. The poplar was a very popular tree among the people of ancient times.

67. This is an elegant reminder for us to acknowledge how this tree was once contemplated so safe and secure and celebrated as a symbol of protection and wellness in those ancient times as well.

68. Poplar tree represents the water element in many forms by providing protection, nourishment and balance to the surroundings.

69. The poplar tree empowers harmony in outstanding issues and healing powers.

70. In American culture, poplar tree symbolizes death because of the fact that poplar trees were used to lynch black people. “The poplar trees were not used for bearing life but for the slaughter of African Americans.

Folklores and mythology about poplar trees

71. According to Greek mythology, the black poplar was created after Phaeton’s ferocious attempt to drive Apollo’s chariot. In some versions, the Phaeton’s seven sisters, known as Heliades, made such an outcry mourning for his death, keeping vigil where Phaeton fell to Earth until the gods transformed the sisters into black Poplar trees and their tears into amber.

Read more about the fate of Phaeton and the reason behind why he drove Apollo’s chariot here.

72. This legend might be the reason for poplar trees rightly seen as the symbol of protection, restoration and balancing conspiracies in controversial issues.

73. The poplar tree symbolises sadness and loneliness. It was once considered unlucky in association with it’s trembling nature.

Due to its massive roots system, it was considered unlucky and a sign of bad luck when planted close to a dwelling.

74. To be more precise, the fallen red male catkins( flower clusters) are portrayed in some folklores ( For instance, in Northern England) as Devil’s fingers and supposed to bring bad luck when touched, collected or even preserved.

Catkins as devil’s fingers

75. The poplar tree is linked with winter season which also symbolises tranquillity and calmness in harsh weather conditions.

76. Greek gods are thought to have woven wreaths made from aspen leaves ( Populus tremula) and Herakles (or Hercules as he is known worldwide in many kinds of literature) was fond of Aspen leaves as cited in many historical scripts such as ( mentioned below)

77. The leaves from this tree were worn as a crown by Hercules after his victory over Cacus ( the guardian of the underworld)

78. In Greek mythology, it is mentioned that the back of the poplar leaf was turned white by the sweat of Herakles or Hercules.

79. In Greek lores, Hercules lit a sacrificial fire of aspen wood when he returned from Hades.

Considering this event, the poplar tree can be seen as a symbol of courage, hope and victory in difficult situations.

80. The poplar tree is vastly used in various enchanted traditions like in divination, creating wands and pendulums from the wood of poplar trees has become a dying art.

81. The Poplar tree emerges in Celtic Tree Astrology as a symbol of creativity, intellectual, confident choices that we made in our lives, loyalty and trust to mention a few of them.

82. There is a myth regarding these trees that sometimes they quake out of repentance because it’s wood became the cross of Christ.

83. Here, I would like to recount one ancient Greco-Roman lore of the most beautiful nymph by the name Leuce. Pluto fell in love with her and abducted her to the underworld. She lived out her remaining life in his realm and when she died, Zeus transformed her into a white poplar tree that would live forever in an Elysium where the pious spent their afterlife.

This legend assumes that poplar tree can be seen as a symbol of fertility, youthfulness, abundance as well as prosperity.

84. Recent evidence dated more than 10,000 years ago suggests an interesting finding that people living along the Euphrates River in the Middle East used poplars for cooking and heating.

85. In 8000 BC, Native American Ojibwe also used poplars for cooking, heating purposes, shelter and used their leaves as medicine.

Native Ojibwe used poplars leaves as medicines

86. Moreover, the Third Dynasty of Ur in Mesopotamia between the Tigris and the Euphrates (modern-day Iraq) used poplar trees to make baskets, boats, construction, ploughs, and as animal fodder in 2100–2000 BC.

87. Archaeological studies have shown that poplar was used for cooking, heating and construction during the period between 700 and 200 BC in Youmulakekum, China, just prior to the Han Dynasty.

88. In 600 AD, the Chinese used poplars for convenience plantings along Xian roadsides and streets, as well as for fuel.

89. In addition, the Hohokam natives used cottonwood for soil stabilization and along irrigation canals in 800 AD in Mexico (now Arizona, USA).

90. European explorers who travelled to the New World in the 17th and 18th centuries often returned with cuttings of poplars to plant in their home gardens.

91. In the early 1800s, the North American explorer’s Lewis and Clark relied on a cottonwood in their quest for a land/river route from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean.

Cottonwood was the source of wood for their canoes, and it was used for cooking, heating and shelter during their successful 2-year transcontinental voyage (DeVoto, 1977).

92. By the mid-1800s, cultivated poplars were so widespread in Europe that they became the motifs for several French Impressionist painters.

93. Arguably the most famous painter of poplars was the French artist Claude Monet, who started painting poplars in 1858 and began his famous ‘poplar’ series in 1891, when he painted hundreds of paintings near Giverny, France.

94. A notable story about Monet is that he ended up purchasing the subjects of his poplar paintings from the community when it threatened to harvest them

Upon learning that a row of poplar trees lining the bank of the river Epte were to be felled, Monet paid to delay the cutting so he could paint them.

95. In Ukrainian folklore and culture, poplar trees symbolize beauty or loneliness of women in love.

The love for poplar tree is beautifully exemplified in this painting, the poplar tree is growing in me by well known Ukrainian artist, Lesia Maydanets.

This 2015 article on the poplar is a clear proof for their love of these trees.

Will poplar trees disappear in Kyiv?

96. Poplar culture in China also goes back several millennia. In the 2400-year- old book, Hui Zi, methods of cutting and layering for planting poplars are interpreted.

97. Another book, Jin Shu, published 1500 years ago, mentioned that poplars and pagoda trees (Styphnolobium japonicum) were planted along roads in cities for shade. They were also used as living trellises to support grapes in vineyards.

As excerpted from the book, Poplars and Willows: Trees for society and the environment.

S

98. In England, on 29th May, the village of Aston-on-Clun, Shropshire still carry out an old custom of decorating the black poplar tree that stands at the centre of the village with flags. The present tree is quite young but is said to be descended from its original tree ancestor. This is ‘The Arbor Tree ceremony’.

“In 1789, on May 29th, the owner of an estate at this place married. His bride’s father was the owner of an adjoining estate. A poplar tree standing at some crossroads was decorated with little flags on every branch to celebrate the wedding and, although it costs several pounds to do so, the tree, now, of course, a giant, is still decorated in the same way every year.”

As excerpted from this article.

Quotes, poems and literature about Poplar trees

99. Quote about October’s Poplars by Nova Bair

October’s poplars are flaming torches lighting the way to winter.”

Nova Bair

100. Strange Fruit by Abel Meeropol

“Southern trees bear strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.”

Abel Meeropol

101. A quote by Edward Bulwer-Lytton

”Trees that, like the poplar, hit upward all their boughs, give no shade and no shelter, whatever their height. Trees the most lovingly shelter and shade us, when, like the willow, the higher soar their summits, the lowlier droop their boughs.”

Edward Bulwer-Lytton

102. A quote by Finley Peter Dunne

“Th’ dead ar-re always pop’ lar. I knowed a society wanst to vote a monyment to a man an’ refuse to help his fam’ly, all in wan night.”

Finley Peter Dunne

103. Roadway Poplars

“All the night the frogs go chuckle, all the day the birds are singing In the pond beside the meadow, by the roadway poplar- lined by, In the field between the trenches are a million blossoms springing ‘Twixt the grass of silver bayonets where the lines of battle wind Where man has manned the trenches for the maiming of his kind.”

Soldier Songs, “The Trench” (1917)

104. The poplar never dry

“The sailing pine, the cedar proud and tall, The vine-prop elm, the poplar never dry, The builder oak, sole king of forests all, The aspen good for staves, the cypress funeral.”

By Edmund Spencer

105. Poplar tree leaves

“The morning of September 1st met the citizen of the village shining with beautiful sunny weather. A refreshing breeze, enriched by acerb fragrances of maple, oak, and poplar tree leaves that already began changing their colours for autumn, blew from the lake.”

Sahara Sanders

106. Poem

“Binsey Poplars”

My aspens dear, whose airy cages quelled,

Quelled or quenched in leaves the leaping sun,

All felled, felled, are all felled;

Of a fresh and following folded rank

Not spared, not one

That dandled a sandalled

Shadow that swam or sank

On meadow and river and wind-wandering weed-winding bank …

By Gerard Manley Hopkins

107. Poem Aspens

The whisper of the aspens is not drowned,

And over lightless pane and footless road,

Empty as sky, with every other sound

Not ceasing, calls their ghosts from their abode,

A silent smithy, a silent inn, nor fails

In the bare moonlight or the thick-furred gloom,

In tempest or the night of nightingales,

To turn the cross-roads to a ghostly room …

By Edward Thomas

108. Espen tree

Espen tree, espen tree, I prithee – To shak an shiver insted o’ me.” (Folk Magic of the Northern Counties- Chapter V – Henderson 1879).

109. The Popular Poplar Tree

When the great wind sets things whirling

And rattles the window panes,

And blows the dust in giants

and dragons tossing their manes;

When the willows have waves like water,

And children are shouting with glee;

When the pines are alive and the larches,—

Then hurrah for you and me,

In the tip o’ the top’ o the top o’ the tip of

the popular poplar tree!

Don’t talk about Jack and the Beanstalk—

He did not climb half so high!

And Alice in all her travels

Was never so near the sky!

Only the swallow, a-skimming

The storm-cloud over the lea,

Knows how it feels to be flying—

When the gusts come strong and free—

In the tip o’ the top’ o the top o’ the tip of

the popular poplar tree!

Blanch Willis Howard

110. A poem by Andrew Blakemore

Against the sky of palest blue

The poplar trees stood straight and tall,

And towered above the rooftops

Casting shadows down beneath.

A cooling breeze caressed their twigs

Which soon would wear a cloak of green,

For summer days were drawing near

That urged the sap to rise.

Within the crowns that lay so bare

A group of crows did try to gain,

The highest point of status

As they squabbled and they fought.

Their raucous calls and flapping wings

Disturbed the silence of the morn,

Until they found their rightful place

And arguments ageed.

Against the sky of palest blue

Their sillhouettes as black as night,

So still they perched amongst the boughs

Upon the poplar trees.

By ANDREW BLAKEMORE

111. Barnes (1879) poems of rural life in the Dorset dialect

THE LINDEN ON THE LAWN.

There yonder poplar trees do plaÿ

Soft music, as their heads do swaÿ,

While wind, a-rustlèn soft or loud,

Do stream ageän their lofty sh’oud;

An’ seem to heal the ranklèn zore

My mind do meet wi’ out o’ door,

When I’ve a-bore, in downcast mood,

Zome evil where I look’d vor good.

O’ they two poplars that do rise

So high avore our naïghbours’ eyes,

A-zet by gramfer, hand by hand,

Wi’ grammer, in their bit o’ land;

The woone upon the western zide

Wer his, an’ woone wer grammer’s pride,

An’ since they died, we all do teäke

Mwore ceäre o’m vor the wold vo’k’s seäke.

An’ there, wi’ stems a-growèn tall

Avore the houses mossy wall,

The while the moon ha’ slowly past

The leafy window, they’ve a-cast

Their sheädes ’ithin the window peäne;

While childern have a-grown to men,

An’ then ageän ha’ left their beds,

To bear their childern’s heavy heads.

112. The poplar field by William Cowper

113. Tree of Liberty

 

“Tree of Liberty:   A tree set up by the people, hung with flags and devices, and crowned with a cap of liberty.  The Americans of the United States planted poplars and other trees during the war of independence, “as symbols of growing freedom.”  The Jacobins in Paris planted their first tree of liberty in 1790.  The symbols used in France to decorate their trees of liberty were tricoloured ribbons, circles to indicate unity, triangles to signify equality, and a cap of liberty.  Trees of liberty were planted by the Italians in the revolution of 1848.”

–  E. Cobham Brewer, The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1894  

References:

A bit of bad luck

Harvard article on poplar trees

poplar tree overview

Eco enchantments- the magic of ogham trees

Strange fruit song

Strange fruit

Binsey poplars

The poem the poplar field

The popular poplar tree poem

Family Salicaceae

Classic Greeks and roman myths

Atlas

Cross and lynching

The linden

* References are provided within the texts where required.

October’s poplars are flaming torches lighting the way to winter.”

Nova Bair

Thank you for reading and highlighting my work. I frequently write for trees and think about them in my happy time. Please visit my blog and do comment on my posts for giving me a little dose of encouragement that I rarely receive.


110 interesting facts and quotes about trees


Do you know a large oak tree can consume about 100 gallons of water per day, and a giant sequoia can drink up to 500 gallons of water on a daily basis?

Trees, undoubtedly, are the major source of oxygen to the planet Earth but it is also an undeniable fact that they silently provide us with plenty of others benefits as well such as food, timber, and shelter to mention a few of them.

Can you believe, it is the custom in many countries of the world to develop some sorts of bonding between themselves and trees. People all around the world have that belief of hanging objects (usually a piece of cloth or paper) on the branches of trees so that they can wish upon them in order to achieve their desired goals.



If you get a chance to read the ancient Egyptian tale of two brothers from at least 3000 years ago then you will realize that how our lives are intermingled and depend upon the trees in so many stunning ways and how ruthlessly our lives suffer when a tree withers or is mistreated. In this story, one of the brothers, to clarify his loyalty to the other brother positioned his heart on the blossom of the cedar tree ( some says it is an accacia tree) and eventually died when that specific tree is cut down.

Here’s a huge collection of fascinating quotes and sayings about trees to understand the deepest meanings of trees as others have perceived and beautifully conveyed to us the message of their love for trees in an artistic style.


Let’s begin


1. “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.”

– Henry David Thoreau, 1817 – 1862



2. “Around a flowering tree, one finds many insects.”

– Proverb from Guinea


3. “Why are there trees I never walk under but large and melodious thoughts descend upon me?”

– Walt Whitman, Song of the Open Road



4. “God is the experience of looking at a tree and saying, “Ah!” ”

– Joseph Campbell



5. “Though a tree grows so high, the falling leaves return to the root.”

– Malay proverb


6. “Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.”

– Chinese proverb



7. “I like trees because they seem more resigned to the way they have to live than other things do.”

– Willa Cather (1873-1947), O Pioneers 1913


8. “Do not be afraid to go out on a limb … That’s where the fruit is.”

– Anonymous


9. At night I dream that you and I are two plants

that grew together, roots entwined,

and that you know the earth and the rain like my mouth,

since we are made of earth and rain.

Pablo Neruda, Regalo de un Poeta


10. “If trees could scream, would we be so cavalier about cutting them down? We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.”

– Jack Handey


11. “Of the infinite variety of fruits which spring from the bosom of the earth, the trees of the wood are the greatest in dignity.”

– Susan Fenimore Cooper



12. “I think that I shall never see

A billboard lovely as a tree.

Perhaps, unless the billboards fall,

I’ll never see a tree at all.”

– Ogden Nash, Song of the Open Road, 1933

13. “The groves were God’s first temples.”

– William Cullen Bryant, A Forest Hymn


14. “From a fallen tree, all make kindling.”

– Spanish proverb


15. “If a tree dies, plant another in its place.”

– Linnaeus



16. “A tree falls the way it leans.”

Bulgarian Proverb


17. “And see the peaceful trees extend

their myriad leaves in leisured dance—

they bear the weight of sky and cloud

upon the fountain of their veins.”

– Kathleen Raine, Envoi


18. “Oak trees come out of acorns, no matter how unlikely that seems. An acorn is just a tree’s way back into the ground. For another try. Another trip through. One life for another.”

– Shirley Ann Grau


19. “The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn.”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson


20. “When you enter a grove peopled with ancient trees, higher than the ordinary, and shutting out the sky with their thickly inter-twined branches, do not the stately shadows of the wood, the stillness of the place, and the awful gloom of this doomed cavern then strike you with the presence of a deity?”

– Seneca


21. “What kind of times are they, when

A talk about trees is almost a crime

Because it implies silence about so many horrors?”

– Bertolt Brecht, To Those Born Later


22. “That each day I may walk unceasingly on the banks of my water, that my soul may repose on the branches of the trees which I planted, that I may refresh myself under the shadow of my sycomore.”

– Egyptian tomb inscription, circa 1400 BCE


Sycomore trees were held to be sacred in ancient Egypt and are the first trees represented in ancient art.


23. “That tree whose leaves are trembling: it is yearning for something.

That tree so lovely to see acts as if it wants to flower: it is yearning for something.”

– Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, 1395


24. “And you, how old are you?

I asked the maple tree:

While opening one hand,

– he started blushing.”

– Georges Bonneau, Le Sensibilite Japonaise, 1935



25. “In an orchard there should be enough to eat, enough to lay up, enough to be stolen, and enough to rot on the ground.”

– James Boswell


26. “The patient. – The pine tree seems to listen, the fir tree to wait: and both without impatience: – they give no thought to the little people beneath them devoured by their impatience and their curiosity.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and His Shadow, # 176.


27. “There are two trees, each yielding its own fruit. One of them is negative….it grows from lack of self-worth and its fruits are fear, anger, envy, bitterness, sorrow – and any other negative emotion. Then there is the tree of positive emotions. Its nutrients include self-forgiveness and a correct self concept. Its fruits are love, joy, acceptance, self-esteem, faith, peace…and other uplifting emotions.”

– Kathi’s Garden


28. “Because they are primeval, because they outlive us, because they are fixed, trees seem to emanate a sense of permanence. And though rooted in earth, they seem to touch the sky. For these reasons it is natural to feel we might learn wisdom from them, to haunt about them with the idea that if we could only read their silent riddle rightly we should learn some secret vital to our own lives; or even, more specifically, some secret vital to our real, our lasting and spiritual existence.”

– Kim Taplin, Tongues in Trees, 1989, p. 14.


29. “A tree does not move unless there is wind.”

– Afghan Proverb



30. “This solitary Tree! a living thing

Produced too slowly ever to decay;

Of form and aspect too magnificent

To be destroyed.”

– William Wordsworth, Yardley Oak


31. “John Clare, in his poem To a Fallen Elm, makes the tree a selfmark as well as a landmark.”

– Tim Fulford, The Politics of Trees


32. “Time-honored, beautiful, solemn and wise.

Noble, sacred and ancient

Trees reach the highest heavens and penetrate the deepest secrets of the earth.

Trees are the largest living beings on this planet.

Trees are in communion with the spiritual and the material.

Trees guard the forests and the sanctified places that must not be spoiled.

Trees watch over us and provide us with what we need to live on this planet.

Trees provide a focal point for meditation, enlightenment, guidance and inspiration.

Trees have a soul and a spirit.”

– Tree Magick by Lavenderwater


33. “A few minutes ago every tree was excited, bowing to the roaring storm, waving, swirling, tossing their branches in glorious enthusiasm like worship. But though to the outer ear these trees are now silent, their songs never cease. Every hidden cell is throbbing with music and life, every fiber thrilling like harp strings, while incense is ever flowing from the balsam bells and leaves. No wonder the hills and groves were God’s first temples, and the more they are cut down and hewn into cathedrals and churches, the farther off and dimmer seems the Lord himself.”

– John Muir


34. “I am the Lorax, I speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues.”

– Dr. Suess



35. “Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them.”

– Bill Vaughan


36. “To be able to walk under the branches of a tree that you have planted is really to feel you have arrived with your garden. So far we are on the way: we can now stand beside ours.”

– Mirabel Osler


37. “Tree of Liberty: A tree set up by the people, hung with flags and devices, and crowned with a cap of liberty. The Americans of the United States planted poplars and other trees during the war of independence, “as symbols of growing freedom.” The Jacobins in Paris planted their first tree of liberty in 1790. The symbols used in France to decorate their trees of liberty were tricoloured ribbons, circles to indicate unity, triangles to signify equality, and a cap of liberty. Trees of liberty were planted by the Italians in the revolution of 1848.”

– E. Cobham Brewer, The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1894


38. “Tall thriving Trees confessed the fruitful Mold:

The reddening Apple ripens here to Gold,

Here the blue Fig with luscious Juice overflows,

With deeper Red the full Pomegranate glows,

The Branch here bends beneath the weighty Pear,

and verdant Olives flourish round the Year.”

– Homer


39. “Knowing trees, I understand the meaning of patience.

Knowing grass, I can appreciate persistence.”

– Hal Borland, Countryman: A Summary of Belief



40. “Trees are the best monuments that a man can erect to his own memory. They speak his praises without flattery, and they are blessings to children yet unborn.”

– Lord Orrery, 1749


41. ” Trees serve as homes for visiting devas who do not manifest in earthly bodies, but live in the fibers of the trunks and larger branches of the trees, feed from the leaves and communicate through the tree itself. Some are permanently stationed as guardians of sacred places.”

– Hindu Deva Shastra, verse 117, Nature Devas


42. “A tree never hits an automobile except in self-defense.”

– Author Unknown


43. “A garden without trees scarcely deserves to be called a garden.”

– Henry Ellacombe


44. “Trees are poems that earth writes upon the sky,

We fell them down and turn them into paper,

That we may record our emptiness.”

– Kahlil Gibran


45. “Hmmm … we chop down trees and chop up wood.”


46. “Wakening from the dreaming forest there, the hazel-sprig sang under my tongue, its drifting fragrance climbed up through my conscious mind as if suddenly the roots I had left behind cried out to me, the land I had lost with my childhood – and I stopped, wounded by the wandering scent.”

– Pablo Neruda


47. “The wonder is that we can see these trees and not wonder more.”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson


48. “Evolution did not intend trees to grow singly. Far more than ourselves they are social creatures, and no more natural as isolated specimens than man is as a marooned sailor or hermit.”

– John Fowles


49. “We have nothing to fear and a great deal to learn from trees, that vigorous and pacific tribe which without stint produces strengthening essences for us, soothing balms, and in whose gracious company we spend so many cool, silent and intimate hours.”

– Marcel Proust, Pleasures and Regrets, 1896


50. “Many a genius has been slow of growth. Oaks that flourish for a thousand years do not spring up into beauty like a reed.”

– George H. Lewis, 1817 – 1878


51. Good timber does not grow with ease; the stronger the wind, the stronger the trees.”

– J. Willard Marriott



52. A cold wind was blowing from the north, and it made the trees rustle like living things.

– George R.R. Martin


53. “The sacred tree, the sacred stone are not adored as stone or tree; they are worshipped precisely because they are hierophanies, because they show something that is no longer stone or tree but sacred, the ganz andere or ‘wholly other.’ ”

– Mircea Eliade, Myths, Dreams and Mysteries


54. “The beauty of the trees,

the softness of the air,

the fragrance of the grass,

speaks to me.

The summit of the mountain,

the thunder of the sky,

speaks to me.

The faintness of the stars,

the trail of the sun,

the strength of fire,

and the life that never goes away,

they speak to me.

And my heart soars.”

– Chief Dan George


55. “He who plants a tree, plants a hope.”

– Lucy Larcom, Plant a Tree


56. “A man does not plant a tree for himself, he plants it for posterity.”

– Alexander Smith


57. “In the religion of the Medes and Persians the cult of trees plays an important part, and with them, as with Assyrians, the symbol of eternal life was a tree with a stream at its roots. Another object of veneration was the sacred miracle tree, which within itself contained the seeds of all.”

– M. L. Gothein, A History of Garden Art, 1928


58. “May my life be like a great hospitable tree, and may weary wanderers find in me a rest.”

– John Henry Jowett


59. “The woods are full of faeries!

The trees are all alive;

The river overflows with them,

See how they dip and dive!

What funny little fellows!

What dainty little dears!

They dance and leap, and prance and peep,

And utter fairy cheers!”

– Anonymous


60. “And on the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for food. Their leaves will not wither nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for food, and their leaves for healing.”

– Ezekiel 47:12


61. “Sensing us, the trees tremble in their sleep,

The living leaves recoil before our fires,

Baring to us war-charred and broken branches,

And seeing theirs, we for our own destruction weep.”

– Kathleen Raine, London Trees


62. “There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it.”

– Minnie Aumonier


63. “Among archetypal images, the Sacred Tree is one of the most widely know symbols on Earth. There are few cultures in which the Sacred Tree does not figure: as an image of the cosmos, as a dwelling place of gods or spirits, as a medium of prophecy and knowledge, and as an agent of metamorphoses when the tree is transformed into human or divine form or when it bears a divine or human image as its fruit or flowers.”

– Christopher and Tricia McDowell, The Sanctuary Garden, 1998, p 128


64. “Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.”

– Abraham Lincoln



65. “I think that I shall never see

A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest

Against the sweet earth’s flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day,

And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in summer wear

A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;

Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me,

But only God can make a tree.”

– Joyce Kilmer, 1886-1918, Trees

66. “What did the tree learn from the earth to be able to talk with the sky?”

– Pablo Neruda


67. “There’s a tree that grows in Brooklyn. Some people call it the Tree of Heaven. No matter where its seed falls, it makes a tree which struggles to reach the sky. It grows in boarded up plots and out of neglected rubbish heaps. It grows up out of the cellar gratings. It is the only tree that grows out of cement. It grows lushly … survives without sun, water and seemingly without earth. It would be considered beautiful except that there are too many of it.”


68. “God has cared for these trees, saved them from drought, disease, avalanches, and a thousand tempests and floods. But he cannot save them from fools.”
– John Muir

69. Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces, I would still plant my apple tree.”

– Martin Luther (1483-1546)



70. “You can live for years next door to a big pine tree, honored to have so venerable a neighbor, even when it sheds needles all over your flowers or wakes you, dropping big cones onto your deck at still of night.

– Denise Levertov, Threat


71. “A well maintained landscape with mature trees can increase property values up to 25 percent. Trees can cool houses in the summer. A city lot with 30 percent plant cover provides the equivalent cooling necessary to air condition two moderately sized houses 12 hours a day in the summer.”

The Value of Trees Around Your Home


72. “There are those who say that trees shade the garden too much, and interfere with the growth of the vegetables. There may be something in this:but when I go down the potato rows, the rays of the sun glancing upon my shining blade, the sweat pouring down my face, I should be grateful for shade.”

– Charles Dudley Warner


73. “It is good to know the truth, but it is better to speak of palm trees.”

Arab Proverb



74. “I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree,

And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk

Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,

But dipped its top and set me down again.

That would be good both going and coming back.

One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.”

– Robert Frost, Birch Trees


75. “The talking oak

To the ancient spoke.

But any tree

Will talk to me.”

– Mary Carolyn Davies


76. “They are beautiful in their peace, they are wise in their silence. They will stand after we are dust. They teach us, and we tend them.

– Galeain ip Altiem MacDunelmor


77. “The great French Marshall Lyautey once asked his gardener to plant a tree. The gardener objected that the tree was slow growing and would not reach maturity for 100 years. The Marshall replied, ‘In that case, there is no time to lose; plant it this afternoon!'”

– As told by John F. Kennedy


78. “Just think of the trees: they let the birds perch and fly, with no intention to call them when they come and no longing for their return when they fly away. If people’s hearts can be like the trees, they will not be off the Way.”

– Langya


79. “If a tree is treated as a living organism, with an understanding of its vital functions, it will be a constant source of profit and pleasure to men.”

– N.T. Mirov


80. “By gathering seed from trees which are close to our homes and close to our hearts, helping them to germinate and grow, and then planting them back into their original landscapes, we can all make a living link between this millennium and the next, a natural bridge from the past to the future.”

– Chris Baines


81. “I never saw a discontented tree. They grip the ground as though they liked it, and though fast rooted they travel about as far as we do. They go wandering forth in all directions with every wind, going and coming like ourselves, traveling with us around the sun two million miles a day, and through space heaven knows how fast and far!”

– John Muir


82. “Approaching a tree we approach a sacred being who can teach us about love and about endless giving. She is one of millions of beings who provide our air, our homes, our fuel, our books. Working with the spirit of the tree can bring us renewed energy, powerful inspiration, deep communion.”

– Druid Tree Lore and the Ogham


84. “Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel.”

– Aldo Leopold


85. “Solitary trees, if they grow at all, grow strong.”

– Winston Churchill



86. “The best friend of earth of man is the tree. When we use the tree respectfully and economically, we have one of the greatest resources on the earth.”

– Frank Lloyd Wright


87. “Thou shalt not destroy the trees thereof by forcing an axe against them:for thou mayest eat of them, and thou shalt not cut them down (for the tree of the field is man’s life)…”

– Deuteronomy 20:19


88. “If we represent knowledge as a tree, we know that things that are divided are yet connected. We know that to observe the divisions and ignore the connections is to destroy the tree.”

– Wendell Berry


89. “Bread and butter, devoid of charm in the drawing room, is ambrosia eaten under a tree.”

– Elizabeth Von Antrim


90. “Some trees serve multiple purposes: the baobab in Africa, the mulberry in China, the coconut palm in the tropics.”



91. “Evil enters like a needle and spreads like a oak tree.”

– Proverb from Ethiopia


92. “The bud is on the bough again,

The leaf is on the tree.”

– Charles Jefferys, The Meeting of Spring and Summer


93. “Trees can reduce utility bills (air conditioning in summer, heating in winter) when planted properly: Heating: Using trees as windbreaks allows savings of 10% – 20%. Cooling: Shading windows and walls can lower AC costs by 25% – 50%.”

The Benefits of Planting Trees


94. “The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit.”

– Nelson Henderson



95. “The forest is a peculiar organism of unlimited kindness and benevolence that makes no demands for its sustenance and extends generously the products of its life and activity; it affords protection to all beings.”

– Buddhist Sutra


96. “The evergreen! How beautiful, how welcome, how wonderful the evergreen! When one thinks of it, how astonishing a variety of nature! In some countries we know that the tree that sheds its leaf is the variety, but that does not make it less amazing, that the same soil and the same sun should nurture plants differing in the first rule and law of their existence.”

– Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, 1814


97. “If I thought I was going to die tomorrow, I should nevertheless plant a tree today.”

– Stephan Girard


98. “They took all the trees

And put them in a tree museum

And they charged all the people

A dollar and a half just to see’em.

Don’t it always seem to go

That you don’t know what you’ve got

Till it’s gone.

They paved paradise

And put up a parking lot.”

– Joni Mitchell, Big Yellow Taxi


99. “Some men go through a forest and see no firewood.”

– English proverb


100. “A tree is our most intimate contact with nature.”

– George Nakashima, woodworker



101. “Look at the trees, look at the birds, look at the clouds, look at the stars… and if you have eyes you will be able to see that the whole existence is joyful. Everything is simply happy. Trees are happy for no reason; they are not going to become prime ministers or presidents and they are

not going to become rich and they will never have any bank balance. Look at the flowers – for no reason. It is simply unbelievable how happy flowers are.”

– Osho


102. “Alone with myself

The trees bend

to carress me

The shade hugs

my heart.”

– Candy Polgar


103. “Whoever does not love trees, does not love God.”

– Elder Amphilochios of Patmos (1888-1970)


104. “The oldest living thing in existence is not a giant redwood, but a bristlecone pine in the White Mountains of California, dated to be aged 4,600 years old.”

– Plants and Botany Trivia



105. “Trees help you see slices of sky between branches, point to things you could never reach.

Trees help you watch the growing happen, watch blossoms burst then dry, see shade twist to the pace of a sun, birds tear at unwilling seeds.”

– Rochelle Mass, Waiting for a Message


106. “The best friend of earth of man is the tree. When we use the tree respectfully and economically, we have one of the greatest resources on the earth.”

– Frank Lloyd Wright


107. “Spirituality automatically leads to humility. When a flower develops into a fruit, the petals drop off on its own. When one becomes spiritual, the ego vanishes gradually on its own. A tree laden with fruits always bends low. Humility is a sign of greatness.”

– Sri Ramakrishna


108. “A tree is a tree – how many more do you need to look at.”

– Ronald Reagan, California Governor



109. “It’s one thing not to see the forest for the trees, but then to go on to deny the reality of the forest is a more serious matter.”

– Paul Weiss


110. The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.


Photos of grand old banyan tree

I am sharing these photos of bohr tree after receiving permission from the Lahore Chitrkar’s fan site in facebook. This grand Borh tree is in Abal Mori, Kot momin close to Sargodha.

The culture of respecting and worshiping trees goes back to the earliest Indus valley civilization. That custom lives on and even today,trees like the peepal, neem and banyan tree for instance, are considered sacred and worshipped. Cutting of trees is considered a sin even today. The practice of planting a tree near a grave have helped save these trees from vanishing. By planting they believed in the continuity of the positive energy of the loved ones in the trees and sharing this energy with all living beings. This has been one of the ways of connecting oneself with the dead ones and with nature.

The myth related to the tree stops people from taking wood from the vicinity as bad omen, so the tree stands grand.

Reference:
Event Gallery: Grand Old Banyan Tree













Banyan tree symbolizes eternal life


A brief note on history of Banyan tree.
They call it Barh or Borh, others call it Banyan, but for me, it always remains a “Bargad ka paed” as it is in Urdu.

Early this year, I went to my native village and found myself wandering around here and there in search of some big huge mighty trees. I found some. I found this. A Banyan tree.

Just along a roadside, behind a small village mosque, stands a beautiful barh or banyan tree which is unique due to its huge and extensive foliage. From a distance, the tree appears like a huge giant providing shade to the mosque. About the exact age of the tree, I can only say, it is much old but maintained perfectly by the villagers. It should be and it showed love and affection of the villagers to this banyan. They even had hide some of its trunks and roots for preserving it.

This showed the complex relationship of a man with the trees around and how we are innately linked together with our environment. A little damage to them would also be a permanent destruction for us( like global warming). In the evening, the barh served as the home for birds, the mystifying chirping and twittering of these birds along with the voice of Azan gives a spiritual experience.

For the villagers in most traditional villages of Pakistan, both banyan and peepal trees provides a meeting place.They used to gather around the shade of the tree to relax, to chat and for discussing and making some important decisions. These trees are a common feature of the village life in Pakistan as they are allowed to grow near houses, mosque and along roadsides.

They are many beliefs about banyan tree in our culture. It is believed that a giant tree is said to have sprung from a twig chewed by the great mystic saint Kabir.

In old days, banyan trees were planted along main roads which served as oasis for travellers, who used to cover long distances either by walking or by riding a horseback. The banains or merchants used to sell their goods under the shade of the tree and eventually banyan bacame the name of the tree itself.

The banyan is a sacred tree, environment-friendly and it symbolizes immortality and eternal life.

A mango tree and a sufi tale

A mango tree and grape vine (on left side) always go side to side. I am lucky to have a grape vine and a mango tree in my home garden. Mango tree has stopped producing flowers and fruits due to lack of some fertilizers but for birds, it is still a favourite spot.

Mango tree is originated in Indo Pak subcontinent. It fruits, and leaves are associated with fortune, peace and fertility.

Mango tree and a sufi tale.

Bulleh shah is a great sufi poet of Punjab. Inayat Shah is the master of Bulleh Shah. This story describes the first meeting of Bulleh Shah with his master.

It is said that even before coming in contact with Inayat Shah, Bulleh Shah used to do some spiritual practice, and had acquired certain miraculous powers.

When Bulleh Shah, the seeker, passed near the gardens of Inayat Shah, he saw fruit laden trees on both sides of the road. Shah Inayat was at that time the head gardener of the Shalimar gardens of Lahore. These gardens are Moghul gardens. Bullah Shah visited these gardens and as it was summer, he roamed in the mango-groves. Inayat Shah himself was engaged in planting onion seedlings.

It occurred to Bulleh Shah to test Inayat Shah of his spiritual power. Invoking the name of God, Bullah looked at the trees, and the fruit started falling on the ground. Inayat Shah looked back and saw that unripe mango fruit was falling from the trees without any reason.

Inayat shah immediately realized that it was due to the mischief played by the young man passing by. He looked towards Bulleh Shah and said,

“Well, young man, why have you brought down the unripe fruit from the trees?”

This is what Bulleh Shah wanted, to find an opportunity to talk to Inayat Shah. He went up to him and said,

“Sir, I neither climbed up the trees, nor did I throw any stones at the fruit, how could I tear it from the trees ?”

Inayat Shah cast a full glance at Bulleh Shah and said, “0, you are not only a thief, you are also being clever!

Inayat shah said: “You do not know how to pronounce properly the holy words and so you reduce their power”.

So saying he used the same invocation and all the mangoes in the gardens fell on the lovely lawns. Once again he repeated the same and the fruit went back on to the trees.

But the Inayat’s glance was so penetrating that it touched Bullah’s heart and he instantly fell at his feet.

Inayat Shah asked him his name and the purpose for coming to him. Bullah replied,

“Sir, my name is Bullah and I wish to know how I can realize God.” Inayat Shah said,

“Why do you look down? Get up and look at me.”

As soon as Bullah raised his head and looked at Inayat Shah, the Master again cast at him a full glance, laden with love, shaking him all through.

He said “0 Bullah, what problem is there in finding God ? It only needs to be uprooted from here and planted there.” This was enough for Bulleh Shah. He got what he had wished for .

Referenes:

The life of Bulleh Shah

A mango tree and a sufi tale

A mango tree and grape vine (on left side) always go side to side. I am lucky to have a grape vine and a mango tree in my home garden. Mango tree has stopped producing flowers and fruits due to lack of some fertilizers but for birds, it is still a favourite spot.

Mango tree is originated in Indo Pak subcontinent. It fruits, and leaves are associated with fortune, peace and fertility.

Mango tree and a sufi tale.

Bulleh shah is a great sufi poet of Punjab. Inayat Shah is the master of Bulleh Shah. This story describes the first meeting of Bulleh Shah with his master.

It is said that even before coming in contact with Inayat Shah, Bulleh Shah used to do some spiritual practice, and had acquired certain miraculous powers.

When Bulleh Shah, the seeker, passed near the gardens of Inayat Shah, he saw fruit laden trees on both sides of the road. Shah Inayat was at that time the head gardener of the Shalimar gardens of Lahore. These gardens are Moghul gardens. Bullah Shah visited these gardens and as it was summer, he roamed in the mango-groves. Inayat Shah himself was engaged in planting onion seedlings.

It occurred to Bulleh Shah to test Inayat Shah of his spiritual power. Invoking the name of God, Bullah looked at the trees, and the fruit started falling on the ground. Inayat Shah looked back and saw that unripe mango fruit was falling from the trees without any reason.

Inayat shah immediately realized that it was due to the mischief played by the young man passing by. He looked towards Bulleh Shah and said,

“Well, young man, why have you brought down the unripe fruit from the trees?”

This is what Bulleh Shah wanted, to find an opportunity to talk to Inayat Shah. He went up to him and said,

“Sir, I neither climbed up the trees, nor did I throw any stones at the fruit, how could I tear it from the trees ?”

Inayat Shah cast a full glance at Bulleh Shah and said, “0, you are not only a thief, you are also being clever!

Inayat shah said: “You do not know how to pronounce properly the holy words and so you reduce their power”.

So saying he used the same invocation and all the mangoes in the gardens fell on the lovely lawns. Once again he repeated the same and the fruit went back on to the trees.

But the Inayat’s glance was so penetrating that it touched Bullah’s heart and he instantly fell at his feet.

Inayat Shah asked him his name and the purpose for coming to him. Bullah replied,

“Sir, my name is Bullah and I wish to know how I can realize God.” Inayat Shah said,

“Why do you look down? Get up and look at me.”

As soon as Bullah raised his head and looked at Inayat Shah, the Master again cast at him a full glance, laden with love, shaking him all through.

He said “0 Bullah, what problem is there in finding God ? It only needs to be uprooted from here and planted there.” This was enough for Bulleh Shah. He got what he had wished for .

Referenes:

The mango

The life of Bulleh Shah

A sufi saint under the shade of a tree

Baba Farid with his disciples sitting under the shade of a tree.

Baba Sheikh Farid Ji was a great Sufi saint, very sweet of tongue and who lived an austere life. He asked for only one blessing from God….a life of prayer and meditation.
His following insight forms the subject of this painting ,

“Sweet are candy, sugar, honey, and buffalo’s milk. Yea, sweet are these but sweeter by far is God.”

In this painting, you can see him pointing at the beehive.

References:
Baba Farid was a 12-th century Sufi preacher and saint of Chishti Order, from Punjab. He was born at Kothiwal (or Khotwal) in the district of Multan. He is recognised as the first major poet of the Punjabi language. Baba Farid is considered one of the holiest and pivotal saints of the Punjab region.

If you want to know more about him, check out these sites:
Life of Baba Farid
Baba Farid

Trees in our folktales

This is a painting by Sabir Nazar showing Heer Ranjha in heaven.

In this painting, Ranjha is riding a buffalo (with its udders full of milk, it symbolizes mother earth). Casually sitting on the broad haunches of the buffalo and playing a tune on the flute, Ranjha symbolizes man’s creativity. He is also a passionate and loyal lover.

And the tree in this image symbolizes eternity.

Heer Ranjha is the most widely read folktale of Pakistan. It is one of the most popular tragic romances of the Punjab about Heer [an extremly bold and beautiful woman] and Ranjha [an adventurous young man] along the banks of River Chenab.

Ranjha comes to Heer’s village where she offers him the job to take care of the cattle. Heer becomes mesmerized by the way Ranjha playes flute and they fall in love. Heer’s jealous uncle Qaido catches them and Heer is forced to marry another man “Saida Khera”. She elopes with Ranjha and eventually gets caught and poisoned by Qaido. Ranjha wails and mourns as Heer’s grave opens and Ranjha lies beside her in an eternal embrace.
You can read the full details of the story here.

Trees have always been considered sacred and get a prominent place in our folktales. And in this folktale, Ranjha is often shown under the shade of a tree playing a flute and taking care of Heer’s cattle. Eventually, Heer becomes mesmerized by the way Ranjha plays his flute and falls in love with him.

No doubt, Sabir Nazar has beautifully illustrated this scene.

Sabir’s first show was held in 1995 at Lahore Art Gallery, featuring a mixed collection of works. Sabir started his career as a cartoonist working for Friday Time in 1991 and designed the famous three horses in Defense. His work revolves around social and symbolic subjects and his cartoons affect his paintings to a great extent, which highlight political changes.


Image credited by:

Heer ranjha by Umair Ghani

Spirituality And Importance Of Trees I n Our Culture And Traditions

To get a full understanding of a society and its culture, it is essential to comprehend it, and it is often necessary to observe their effects because people are often unaware of them. It does not matter whether this social groups are related to business, religion, the legal system, or families. They all have functions. For instance, the primary function of a legal system is likely to be the maintenance of the social order in society.

The culture of respecting and worshipping trees goes back to the earliest Indus valley civilization. The seals show that plants were regarded as holy and the homes of divine spirits. That custom lives on and even today, plants and trees like the Tulsi,Peepal, Neem and Banyan tree for instance, are considered sacred and worshipped. Cutting of trees is considered a sin even today. Incidentally trees particularly regarded as sacred,are not only storehouses of numerous medicinal

The traditional practice of planting saplings on the tomb of the dead used to be common among the tribal people. By planting they believed in the continuity of the positive energy of the loved ones in the trees and sharing this energy with all living beings. This has been one of the ways of connecting oneself with the dead ones and with nature. In modern times the people have neglected this traditional practice of conservation of ecosystems and started using brick and stone for the tombs. (In some villages the local people bury and not cremate it)but this traditional wisdom has been revived and many people started planting fruit saplings on the tombs or near the tombs. These trees will never be cut as they are sacred.

Similarly Islam places a lot of emphasis on protecting trees.After death, bodies are not burnt but buried in the ground which in a way enriches the soil and saves wood. A tree is also planted over the grave. Even superstitions have helped our environment! There is a belief that one should not pluck flowers at night. Another belief says one should not sleep under a tree at night. Trees are sacred in this part of the World and trees are used in many rituals ceremonies.

Oak Tree and a myth

Oaks that found in Pakistan are important in ecological terms because they grow only in forests that are mature with plenty of healthy undergrowth in the form of vibrant grasses and bushes and a wide array of specialized tree species. Holly oak is native to the Mediterranean region. The range is from Spain along the Mediterranean fringe east towards western Pakistan. The Holly Oak is a long lived, durable tree that will thrive in almost any location once established and stands up well to strong winds. It provides shade for large areas of the landscape.
This time sharing with you a folklore associated with the god of thunder and it has been said that the fifth day of the week ‘Thursday’ (Thor’s day) was named after him.
Read this fascinating folklore about the god of thunder.


The Myth

The oak-tree was consecrated to the god of thunder because oaks are said to be more likely to be struck by lightning than other trees.The god most associated with the oak tree is Thor (also known as: Thorr, Thunor, Thonar, Donar, Donner, Thur, Thunar, or Thunaer), who in Norse mythology was the supreme god of thunder and the sky. Thor was the eldest son of Odin, and was second only to him in the hierarchy of the Norse pantheon. He was also one of the most popular of the gods due to his relationship with mankind. Thor is often depicted as a tall, muscular and vigorous man with a red beard. He had an enormous appetite and his ability to eat and drink great quantities is featured in several of his legends. Thor was the principal champion of the gods and the chief protector of humans against giants, trolls, demons and other evil beings. His booming voice and flashing eyes could incite terror in his enemies. He was thought to be good-natured, courageous, benevolent, valiant and always ready to fight to help mankind, but he was also easily irritated and when roused to anger was apt to smash his adversaries to death with a single blow from “Mjolnir” his magical hammer.

Thor was widely worshiped by Norse warriors but was also revered by farmers and peasants because of his capacity to create rain for the crops. Mjolnir the magical hammer was reputedly made by dwarves from the wood of a sacred oak tree, and not only represented the destructive power of the storms Thor created (the fires from heaven), but its image was used as a fertility symbol in marriages (in its connection with rain and crops) and in funerals (as a symbol of death and rebirth), and for accepting newborn children into the community (as a symbol of strength and protection). Such was he revered that the fifth day of the week ‘Thursday’ (Thor’s day) was named after him.

When travelling Thor rode in a chariot made from oak drawn by two goats, Tanngnjostr (Tooth-gnasher) and Tanngrisnir (Tooth-grinder), and when moving across the heavens dispensing weather, it produced the rumblings of thunder and sparks of lightening from its wheels. Thor and his followers undertook many expeditions to Jotunheim (Iceland) the land of the frost giants, and there erected high-seated pillars of oak. These they used to hallow new ground enabling the gods to protect their people in new lands.

Thor fought many legendary battles against the frost giants defending and protecting mankind as well as the gods. His greatest adversary was the World Serpent called “Jormungand” whose many coils encircled the world. After many battles between them which neither won, they were destined to meet and fight for a final time at “Ragnarok” (the mythical end of the world). At that fatal meeting Thor, the best fighter amongst the gods, succeeded in killing the serpent. However being busy with his own fight, he was too late to aid his father Odin who died fighting the fierce wolf Fenrir. After killing the serpent Thor stepped back and died himself from the poison the serpent had spat at him.

Oak through the ages was revered by many cultures particularly for its protective qualities, and in Britain it still stands proud as the “King of the Forest”. In early Celtic times certain oaks were marked with a protective symbol, a circle divided into four equal parts (symbolic of the four elements – Earth, Air, Fire and Water), this was probably a forerunner of the magic pentacle (an up-right five pointed star in-side a circle, symbolic of the four elements plus “spirit”). Most likely this was an old druidic custom for the druids revered the oak above all other trees, believing it hosted the energy, power and strength of their gods. Due to its size and longevity the oak was known as the “Garden in the Forest”, for it attracts the growth of various forms of plant life.

Reference::
Taken some data from Oak tree-in worship of trees-

Love your Earth

“A tree is not just a tree, but it is part of the ecosystem. if you cut a tree, you kill many living things.”

Name of design : a tree is not just a tree
Design by : naoya yoko + jun tashiro (agasuke) from japan

Reference::

Designboom

Beech – A tree for practical knowledge.

Getting behind the plants physical,healing and practical qualities is key to understanding their character.

Mythical meanings and qualities of Beech Tree:

The Beech was linked in folklore to granting wishes. Today it might be called the graffiti tree because people would traditionally carve their wishes into the tree or write spells on the wood. This is was seen in later times with lovers putting their initials in the bark.

Beech tree symbolizes prosperity. For wishes to be granted one must communicate truly what is needed or desired. It is the intent that is the secret ingredient, you must take an active part. Step through the opening doors and keep your eye focused firmly on that dream. If this vision involves a partnership, whether romantic or practical, make this commitment public . If it involves material gain, go through the traditional channels of knowledge and education.


Similar article:
Maple tree-A tree to highlight the simple pleasures.