The survival of an heritage tree

This picture recently receives my attention on the social media platform. It happens when a person by the name Hamayun Mughal shared this image with a local gardening group on Facebook and it awestruck me since then.

The battle of the survival of the heritage and tree

I was stunned to find this kind of tree that has embedded its roots deep in the walls of a neglected building. Out of curiosity, a little research on it reveals that it is a Haveli (mansion) Sujan Singh which is located in the overcrowded market of Bhabhra Bazar, Rawalpindi.

It was built in the early 1890s by a wealthy businessman Rai Bahadur Sujan Singh in the Colonial era.

The haveli was built to resemble a royal palace with a majestic golden throne and bedrooms with original ivory furniture. In the various courtyards dancing peacocks were kept to dance during the evening and a pet tiger was kept which regularly walked the corridors.

Wikipedia

It might be a spell-binding place in the olden days but now some parts of the haveli have been badly demolished, with collapsed roofs and termite-ridden walls further damaging the place. Hence, the building has been left to crumble and rot with time.

But then this happened…

But then this happened, nature decided to take over the entire place with its own leafy interwoven pattern.

Can you see the place craftily overtaken by self-grown plants and trees of different sizes and types!
It is recognized as a heritage site by the government of Pakistan.

This is presuming a heritage tree because it has ecological and cultural value. It has beautifully embedded itself in a place that is recognized as a heritage site by the government of Pakistan.


This kind of tree takes pleasure in its transformations. It looks familiar, quiet, and consistent in its appearances, but few of us know how much wisdom and insight this kind of tree endures inside its roots. It is freaking sober and relaxes where it is supposed to be.


Here let us redefined a heritage tree:

  • A heritage tree is defined as a tree of cultural, biological, ecological, or historical concern depending upon its age, size, or condition.
  • They are often among the oldest living things in the country.
  • They are found in native forests, historic parks, farms, and estates of a country.
  • They are usually along roadsides and in agricultural fields and sometimes find in the middle of residential areas or development sites.
  • There is a need to preserve these trees for ecological and economic reasons.

What kind of tree it is?

This is a peepal tree which is one of the most beloved trees in the South Asian community.

There is a need to understand that native trees are highly aggressive and invasive while having an innate ability to spread almost anywhere.

This tree might be 10-20 years old or younger. It’s spread slowly but steadily when given ideal surroundings.

It’s a symbol of strength, morale, resistance and knowledge.

Throughout history, the peepal tree has been represented in different mythologies and sometimes linked to powerful gods. The peepal tree is considered a cosmic storehouse of wisdom comprised of tremendous strength. It grows slowly, but surely at its rate.

Are you wondering from where this tree is obtaining nourishment and overall strength?

  • Many factors are responsible for its growth such as an abundance of light is essential for photosynthesis, a process by which a plant manufactures its food.
  • The tree roots are well anchored and ingrained deeply requiring both organic and inorganic nutrients from the building.
  • The bricks are mostly wet and damp. So, you can see that the tree is receiving moisture from the rainwater and the structure itself.

Final thoughts:

I have heard that restoration work is in progress to revive this old-time architectural wonder. My only concern is that they don’t cut down this tree. I understand it must be a challenging task for them to preserve this historical site. Let’s hope for the best.

Sources:

Image courtesy: Facebook group post by Humayun Mughal

Haveli Sujan Singh


Thank you for reading. Please like, share and follow my blog.

Tree stories: The Olive Trees and the Driftwood

It is an interesting anecdote from ancient times when storytelling was considered an important element of everyday life. It was considered a source of inspiration for the general public gatherings of that bygone era.

The story I am intended to share today is from the life of Mullah Nasruddin Hodja who was a contemporary scholar and wise man of his time.

Olive trees on the hill

The Olive Trees and the driftwood

This is a short story of a farmer who asked a very decent question from Nasruddin whether or not his olive trees would bear fruits in the coming season.

Oh Hodja! Would my olives 🫒 bear this year?

“They will bear,” said the wise old Mullah.

“How do you know?”

“I just know, that is all.”

Upon saying that, he went away


Sometimes later, it’s so happened that the same farmer saw Nasrudin scurrying his donkey along a seashore, looking for driftwood.

(Driftwood is a kind of wood that has been washed onto a shore or beach, lake, or river by the action of winds, tides or waves)

“There is no wood here, Mullah, I have looked,” he shouted.

Some hours later, the same man saw Nasrudin treading his way home, tired out, still without fuel.

On seeing this, the farmer addressed him mockingly.

“You are a man of knowledge, who can tell whether an olive tree will bear or not. Why can’t you tell whether there is wood on a seashore or not?”

Upon this, Nasruddin wisely replied.

“I know what must be,” confessed Nasrudin, “but I do not know what may be.”

Final thoughts:

The term driftwood is used for a person who has difficulty making decisions quickly and firmly. The one who hesitates to take decisions on time. On the other hand, olive tree stands firm and grounded. It symbolize the eternal link between man and the earth.

Driftwood on a beach on a misty day

The driftwood also symbolizes the eternal connection of man with the ocean.

This is the contrast difference between an alive tree versus a dead traveling tree that is just going on with the flow. Finding driftwood depends on many factors as they mostly rely on winds and storms to be swept away on the beaches and shores.

Olive trees mean longevity because they are renowned for living for thousands of years.

On the other hand, driftwood reminds us that they are just woody remnants of dead trees that wind up progressing through rivers, lakes, or oceans.

The phrase I know what must signify a classic example of whatever is meant or predestined to happen will happen as indicated by bearing olives.

But I do not what may indicate uncertainty when you are not sure about something that may happen in the future as in the case of not discovering driftwoods along a seashore on that hot summer day.


Nasreddin Hodja is considered a philosopher, Sufi, and wise old man. He is remembered throughout the Middle East for his witty stories and anecdotes. Usually, there is the joke, followed by a moral message which brings the consciousness on the road to realization.


Thank for reading📖. Please like 👍, share 🔄, and follow 🔂 my blog.


Quote of the day

“If not ignored, nature will cultivate in the gardener a sense of well-being and peace. The gardener may find deeper meaning in life by paying attention to the parables of the garden. Nature teaches quiet lessons to the gardener who chooses to live within the paradigm of the garden.”

– Norman H. Hansen, The Worth of Gardening

Nature teaches quiet lessons to the gardener who prefers to see the garden as a set of ideas. Do you believe in spiritual awakening where we can feel, sense or know about our virtuous energy that flows freely through us?

These are the pictures that I recently click while waiting patiently outside an embassy office.

No matter how many expensive cameras and gadgets I purchase for the pleasure of it but when it comes to photography, I am dead. I become numb and don’t know how to beautifully seize a day in pictures. I seldom share my photography because of the criticism I receive afterwards.

Though I do try to take photos because of the large amount of money I have wasted on them. Don’t take me wrong, I do like photography and have no regrets whatsoever. But the idea of taking a perfect picture exhausts me out. I am the kind of person who carelessly takes photos while travelling far away places.

Thank you for reading.

This 150 years old banyan tree in Sialkot on the verge of being cut down!

I recently came to know about a magnificent banyan tree standing alone in a middle of a densely populated area that is recently on the brink of getting extinct in her own country of origin.

Today, my efforts are about saving a tree from the dire consequences of the pure stubbornness of her people. The problem is when the tree is cut off there will be none left. It will never be replaced. People need to understand why there is always a need to save such century-old trees.

Today, I am going to document the story of a banyan tree in Sialkot which is on the verge of being cut down by the local community.

Due to a very ridiculous reason that it yielded too much foliage which is unbearable for the neighbours and the passers-by alike.

They gave an improper justification to prove their point that it is very tiresome for the residents of that area to clear the mess of the fallen leaves especially for those neighbours who park their cars under the shade of this thriving tree.

It is a bitter reality that every year thousands of trees are being chopped off for the sake of development work. It is a very gruesome and barbaric act to destroy such national heritage.

The life span of banyan tree

The minimum life span of such a banyan tree is approximately 300-500 years. But if you allow the aerial roots and branches of banyan trees to expand in favourable conditions then the chances of survival of such trees are maximum. It is not an assumption but a fact that the banyan tree can easily survive for thousands of years.


This screenshot is obtained from a Facebook group by the name of Desi Gardening

Citizen’s role in saving this tree

It should be kept in mind that this modest-looking tree is probably 150 year’s old according to a concerned citizen by the name of Yasir Mirza who first highlight this issue by talking about it on various social media platforms.

According to him, this tree was planted by his paternal grand-uncle Munshi Nizam din in the era of British colonial rule in India.

Yeh tau hamare dada k bhai ne Munshi Nizam din ne angrez daur may lagaya tha”

Yasir Mirza

“Furthermore, its home to hundreds of birds”

Yasir Mirza

In most traditional villages of Pakistan, a banyan tree serves as an ideal meeting place for the entire village community but the problem with this specific tree is that it lies in the middle of an urban area with cemented paths and alleys.


The definition of an heritage tree

Before ending this post, here I would like to briefly define heritage trees and why there is a need to preserve such trees. An heritage tree is any kind of tree that is more than 50 years old and is of both cultural and ecological significance. It should be of some historical importance as well and provide food, medicine and shelter to the entire ecosystem.

Now I left this question for you to think about which measurements we should take to save this national heritage?

Thank you for reading. Please like, share and comment to let me know what do you thing about this post.

Sources:

Desi Gardening Facebook Group post by Yasir Mirza

Giant banyan tree in our street by Yasir Mirza


15 incredible photos of the trees around the world!

Today, I am not going to talk anything about bridges or mountains or the sky full of showery clouds. There is always hope at the beginning of cultivating new things. I am talking about trees in their most glorifying form. Let’s talk about the most spectacular living component of our natural world.

Trees, trees, and trees everywhere of different shapes and sizes to maintain a balance in the ecosystem.

“A tree is known by its fruit; a man by his deeds.  A good deed is never lost; he who sows courtesy
reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love.”
–   Basil

I recently came to know about a very heartbreaking story shared by a concerned citizen from my home country that people in his neighbourhood are intended to kill a 150 years old banyan tree because it produced too much foliage and hence creating a mess of fallen leaves everywhere. It’s shocking to hear such ridiculous stories where people are mercilessly killing trees for some extra amount of cash.

(Here, a link to this Facebook post)

Trees help to strengthen a balance in the ecosystem. It is rightly said that trees are sanctuaries and have the power to enrich our souls throughout the year. They reassure and calm us down by the mere rustling of their leaves.

“Trees are sanctuaries.  Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth.  They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.” –  Hermann Hesse,  Wandering  

Unfortunately, the rate at which these trees are being cut down is very frightening in my country of origin. I don’t like tragic endings but chopping down an old tree that is also more than 150 years old is a crime in itself.

However, some of the giant old trees are difficult to forget or hard to go unnoticed. Here, I am compiling a list of 15 different types of trees around the world for you to cherish and admire.

“Follow the wisdom provided by nature. Everything in moderation – sunlight, water, nutrients. Too much of a good thing will topple your structure.  You can’t harvest what you don’t sow. So plant your desires, gently nurture them, and they will be rewarded with abundance.”

–  Vivian Elisabeth Glyck, 1997

These are the 15 most seen photos of the trees online that have been continually been shared on various social media platforms. Some people have personally visited these places to take us back to the wilderness.

The first on my list is a tree from Pakistan which has beautifully embedded herself on the wall of a neglected building.

1. That one tree struggles to revive the old heritage


2. Yes, we are talking about the roots here!


3. When mother nature thrives back


4. The Bristlecone pine tree on the rim of the Crater lake, National park, Oregon, USA


5. One of the oldest living beings in Portugal


6. This happens when the tree decides to start a new life


7. The Dragon blood tree as photographed by Daniel Kordan


8. Desert Rose is pink in colour!


9. The world oldest Olive tree, estimated to be over 3000 years old. It is still producing olives on the isle of Crete.


10. The world-famous tree house (Believe it or not). Let’s go there!


11. Arashiyama Bamboo forest is breathtaking!


12. The woods are full of fairies!
The trees are all alive!


13: Elephant paw tree in bloom


14. The daisugi technique – an ancient Japanese pruning method from the 14th century that allows lumber production without cutting down trees


15: 1400-year-old Ginkgo tree


Source: I took these images from various Facebook groups which are mostly focused on trees.


Thank you for reading. Please like, share and comment if you like this post of 15 incredible photos of the trees around the world.


What is the word for the sound of wind in trees?

Today, I am going to tell you an interesting story that I have heard recently. This is a story of a man named Nasruddin who liked to spend some time under a huge oak tree. An oak tree that happened to be near a field of melons.

He used to question himself while resting under the shade of that huge oak tree and mumbled in silence that everyone believes that…

“The Creator has a grand plan, but if I look closely at this majestic Oak tree which has very small acorns as compared to these angular melon plants with their huge bulky fruits. I think the Creator has made a mistake on this one.”

He was just thinking about this that all of a sudden an acorn fell precisely on his nose and he cried in pain by saying that

“Oh my God! Now I understand the wisdom of the Creator!”

The above story has nothing to do with this post but we should remember, that there is always a spiritual message hidden in every moral story. In this story, we learned in a very witty style from a man called Nasruddin that everything on this planet is made on purpose and there is a reason for our existence.


The tree which moves some to tears of joy


Now coming to the real topic, I would like to say that we find comfort only in the beauty of others, in the poetry of others and so we keep on living torn up between the brief explosions of solitude and self-realization which taste like opium, a kind of drug that when excessively taken can give you a blurred vision or sometimes even hallucination.

We are people rinsed by dreams and the tree which moves some to tears of pure joy is in the opinion of others is merely a green thing that stands in their mighty way.

The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way.  Some see Nature as all ridicule and deformity, and some scarce see Nature at all.  But to the eyes of the man of imagination, Nature is Imagination itself.”
–  William Blake, 1799, The Letters    

We tend to fall in love with the little things about nature, like the sound of wind in the trees and the way their branches moves over us in a swinging fashion and hence protecting us from the direct rays of sunlight.


What is the word for the sound of wind in trees?


The sound of wind blowing through the trees is mesmerising and have the power to bring our childhood memories back. Through ages, people have invented many words to describe their favourite sounds.

The sound of the wind is so appealing that when it pass or encounter any obstacle, it is known as the Eolian sound as described in Britannica.

Similarly, there is also a word for the sound of wind in the trees and the rustling of leaves. It comes from the Greek word psithuros means whispering.

Psithurism is the word described by many tree enthusiasts when the wind blows through the trees and produced a rustling sound.


This image is designed by using the Canva app.


Psithurism is a very difficult word to pronounce if you are not familiar with silent words. There is an explanation for pronouncing weird words in the English language. It should be kept in mind that “p” at the start of psithurism is silent as can be mostly seen with the words that usually start with “ps”. Hence, the psithurism word is pronounced as sith-err-iz-um.


All conversation begins under the shade of trees.


I like trees in their most vulnerable form when they are busy gossiping happily with their neighbour trees and swaying their branches in full rhythm.

To conclude, I would say that that the powerful way of healing and restoring energy is by listening to the sound of nature. Spending time with trees reduces blood pressure and relieves stress and anxiety as it is rightly said all good conversations begin under the shade of trees.


Thank you for visiting my blog. If you like this post, then please like, share and comment.

You can also follow me on my Facebook page. Quora is also a space that I recently joined.


Also read: Tree hugging is real and it works

A world full of new things

There is a time in life when you expect the world to be always full of new things. And then comes a day when you realize that is not how it will be at all. You see that life will become a thing made of holes. Absences. Losses. Things that were there and are no longer. And you realize, too, that you have to grow around and between the gaps, though you can put your hand out to where things were and feel that tense, shining dullness of the space where the memories are.

Helen Macdonald, H is for Hawk

I am most alive among the tall trees!

“A tree is our most intimate contact with nature.” ― George Nakashima

5 Things You Should Know About The Colour Green

She teaches me the name of flowers

Lovers of pine

Lovers of pine is a Japanese folktale about two lovers that become two young pine trees by sitting under a shade of an old pine tree.



It happened in ancient times when the capital of Japan was still the city of Nara. (Nara, located around 30 km south of modern Kyoto, was the capital of ancient Japan between 710 and 784 CE.)

There lived a young man named Iratsuko and a girl named Iratsume. They were both very beautiful people which caused many people to gossip about them.

“It would be good if the Iratsuko and Iratsume fell in love,” people would say.

But the two of them didn’t notice each other at all. Iratsuko heard what people were saying but he only waved his hand while Iratsume only smiled as she continued on her way.

One evening while the people of the village were staging a big celebration they gathered in the forest glade and began to sing, dance and compose poems.

Then the young man approached Iratsume.

“Turn to look at me,” he asked her. “You are beautiful, like a young pine. Give me some sign that you love me.”

“Do not befit me to listen to such speeches,” she said blushing. “I confess however that I have loved you for a long time. People noticed us, which lead to conversations which in turn made me curious.”

Then everyone began to eavesdrop on their conversation.

“When are you going to be married?” the people called.

“Leave us in peace. Do not look at us, do not touch us” Iratsuko said with anger as he grabbed the girl by the hand and ran into the forest.

“It’s not like we hurt them,” the people said shaking their head. “We were just happy at their good fortune in finding each other at last.”

The two lovers ran into the woods and sat down under an old pine tree.

“Those people never give you a moment’s peace,” Iratsuko snarled.

“It’s true, people are forever sticking their noses into others business,” Iratsume agreed.

It was dark and quite, with only the moon in the sky for light and the gentle sound of the leaves falling from the trees. The two of them sat up all night by the old pine and didn’t notice that morning had come. When the sun rose over the mountain they looked around, they could hear roosters in the distance and a dog barking.

“Let’s go back to the village,” Iratsuko said, but as he tried to rise he found that he was rooted to the ground.

“I’ll help you!” Iratsume exclaimed, but her feet were rooted to the ground as well.

“What’s happened to us!?” the two lovers exclaimed in surprise.

Meanwhile the rest of the villagers came into the forest to search for Irasuko and Iratsume. And lo and behold at the edge of the woods they found two young pine trees. The people gasped when they saw these pines.

“Look, look! It’s Iratsuko and Iratsume. They have turned into pine trees,” the people cried.

Iratsume and Iratsuko heard this and grew frightened for they realized that they must surely have become pine trees.  So they were now two pine trees at the edge of the forest. Sometimes farmers come into the woods and sit under them while asking, “How are you my pretty Iratsume? And is Iratsuko feeling well?”

That’s when the pine creaks and the pines wave and the tree seems to say. “Again you break our peace! We get no salvation from you. Do not look at us, do not touch us.”

So the farmers sigh and eventually go away. So the pine Iratsume is called “do not look at me,” and the pine Iratsuko is called, “do not touch me.”



Source:

Japanese Fairy Tale

Tree quote: Learn character from trees

Tree quote

Learn character from trees, values from roots, and change from leaves.

by Tasneem Hameed

Happy reading.

A billboard lovely as a tree

A quote about trees by Ogden Nash

“I think that I shall never see
A billboard lovely as a tree.
Perhaps, unless the billboards fall,
I’ll never see a tree at all.”
–   Ogden Nash, Song of the Open Road, 1933    

Thank you for reading.

Quotes about understanding the wisdom of trees

Understanding the mother earth is the most challenging thing a person can endure in today’s world. To early man, trees were objects of awe and wonder. Perhaps, this is the reason for worshipping them. The mystery of their growth, the movement of their leaves and branches, the way they seemed to die and come again to life in spring used to the marvel of nature. The sudden growth of the plant from the seed – all these considered being miracles as indeed.


15 inspiring quotes on trees

Here is the compilation of some inspiring quotes about understanding the true meaning of planting trees in your vicinity.


1.The best friend on earth of man is the tree: when we use the tree respectfully and economically we have one of the greatest resources of the earth.”
– Frank Lloyd Wright


2. “A man has made at least a start on discovering the meaning of human life when he plants shade trees under which he knows full well he will never sit.”
– Elton Trueblood (1900-1994)


3. “I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast”
– Joyce Kilmer, Trees


4. “We must protect the forests for our children, grandchildren and children yet to be born. We must protect the forests for those who can’t speak for themselves such as the birds, animals, fish and trees.”
– Chief Edward Moody, Qwatsinas, Nuxalk Nation


5. “Someone’s sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.”
– Warren Buffett


6. “Approaching a tree we approach a sacred being who can teach us about love and about endless giving. She is one of millions of beings who provide our air, our homes, our fuel, our books. Working with the spirit of the tree can bring us renewed energy, powerful inspiration, deep communion.”

– Druid Tree Lore, Ovate Grade lecture


7. “Today I have grown taller from walking with the trees.”
– Karle Wilson Baker


8. “Let the trees be consulted before you take any action
every time you breathe in thank a tree
let tree roots crack parking lots at the world bank headquarters
let loggers be druids specially trained and rewarded
to sacrifice trees at auspicious times
let carpenters be master artisans
let lumber be treasured like gold
let chainsaws be played like saxophones
let soldiers on maneuvers plant trees give police and criminals a shovel
and a thousand seedlings
let businessmen carry pocketfuls of acorns
let newlyweds honeymoon in the woods
walk don’t drive
stop reading newspapers
stop writing poetry
squat under a tree and tell stories.”

– John Wright


9. “A tree uses what comes its way to nurture itself. By sinking its roots deeply into the earth, by accepting the rain that flows towards it, by reaching out to the sun, the tree perfects its character and becomes great. … Absorb, absorb, absorb. That is the secret of the tree.”

– Deng Ming-Dao, Everyday Tao, 1996, p. 18.


10. “What does he plant who plants a tree?
He plants the friend of sun and sky;
He plants the flag of breezes free;
The shaft of beauty, towering high;
He plants a home to heaven anigh
For song and mother-croon of bird
In hushed and happy twilight heard –
The treble of heaven’s harmony
These things he plants who plants a tree.”

– Henry Cuyler Bunner, The Heart of the Tree


11. “Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth.”

– Herman Hesse


12. “The poetry of the earth is never dead.”
–  John Keats 


13. “A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.”

– Franklin D. Roosevelt


14. “I refuse to have an emotional attachment to a piece of ground. At one end of the scale it’s called patriotism, at the other end of the scale it’s called gardening.” – Bob Shaw
15. “If a tree dies, plant another in its place.”
– Linnaeus  

Happy reading to you! You can participate here by sharing your favourite quote about trees here as well.

Keeping an appointment with a beech tree

A quote about trees by Henry David.

“I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.”
–  Henry David Thoreau,  1817 – 1862  

Thank you for reading.

The oldest living thing

 

“The oldest living thing in existence is not a giant redwood, but a bristlecone pine in the White Mountains of California, dated to be aged 4,600 years old.”

–  Plants and Botany Trivia 

 

The tree which is known as the god of fire

 Tree profile:

    Common Names: Coral tree, Indian Coral tree
    Scientific Names: Butea monosperma, Butea frondosa, Erythrina monosperma
    Family: Fabaceae
    Subfamily: Faboideae
    Local Names: Flame of the Forest, Dhak, Palas, Bastard Teak, Parrot Tree, kesu, gule nishter
    Origin: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
    Plant Characteristics: Woody. No latex, aromatic flowers, (Trifoliate) Compound leaves, have alternate arrangements of leaves.

An interesting introduction to the Coral tree  (Dhaak/ Palash tree)

You may or may not know me but I am a tree native to tropical and subtropical regions of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Srilanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, to name a few ones.

People of these countries adore me so much that they love to call me by different names in their local languages and dialects.

I am a small-sized dry season, deciduous tree. It simply means that I can shed my leaves when the autumn dawns. I can grow up to 15 m (49 ft) tall. I admire my striking height. Though I limped sometimes.

Scientifically, I am known as Butea monosperma throughout the world as it is my botanical name. I am also described in some textbooks as Butea frondosa so please don’t get confused if someone mentions me by this name. It’s my synonym.

I have so many related names but for the lack of time, I would like to mention a  few of them to keep the momentum going. I have compiled a list of some of my favorites.

In English speaking countries, I am known as bastard teak or parrot tree.

In the Hindi language, I am entitled to be known as chichra tasu, desuka, Palash, chalcha, Kankrei, etc.

 

To begin with,  I am widely acknowledged as the flame of the forest or flame tree because of my vibrant personality. It’s an interesting read. I am prized for my flowers which take on a fascinating look in late spring due to the orange-red hue of my flowers.

For this reason, I am symbolized as the color of love in South Asian cultures and also known to be assumed as a first sign for the arrival of spring.

Notoriously, I am recognized as the bastard teak because of my striking resemblance with the teak tree in having the same features such as hard durable wood.

Where am I located? I am currently blooming proudly in the salt ranges of Pakistan. Here, I am locally known as Chahchra or Dhaak.

This image is taken from Dawn.com

 

I possess the ability to endure elevated amounts of salt in the soil and withstand extreme changes in weather. Hence, I am widely distributed in the salt ranges of Pakistan or can also be seen growing easily in coastal areas of my country.

Palash (which means a flowering tree) is another splendid name that has become my recognition in my neighbor country. They even named their newborn baby boys with my name to show their affection for me. I feel so honored and blessed.

Some say the town of Palashi in West Bengal adopts its name from the Palash tree. (Note: The town was famous for the historic battle of Plassey fought there). What a great way to tribute this tree!

A parrot tree is another pleasant name that is bestowed on me. I am so intricately designed that my stunning orange-red flowers appear before the leaves. Each flower consists of five petals comprising one standard, two smaller wings, and a very curved beak-shaped keel. It is this beak-shaped keel that lends me the name of Parrot Tree.

 

You might have heard of that popular Urdu proverb, “dhaak k teen paat” which comes from the prominent three leaflets shape of this tree.  The phrase means efforts leading to no results.

Despite being known as a prized tree by nature enthusiasts or Hakeem, I receive little interest from the general public.

Fated to be named as the flame of the forest, I am now mostly regarded as an ornamental tree.

The reason for the decline of these trees in rural areas is because the inhabitants here do not prefer to plant new saplings of these species. After all, they considered these trees to be slow-growing.

Sadly, a little has been done to preserve this magnificent tree. It was known to thrive in abundance in the salt ranges of Kohistan.  But now the number has been dramatically decreased with time due to the constant need for its wood to use as fuel.

This tree is humbly requesting you to craft ways to protect it from vanishing from its beloved country.

How can we protect the Dhak tree from extinction?

It has been real injustice to this kind of tree. It grows even on dead mountains, does so well in salty soils, and proves to be an incredible host to lac Insects.

Now, it’s time to give the due credit and affection to these Dhak trees.


Here are some ways to conserve this tree for future generations to come.

1. Write more about native trees/ Awareness plays a critical role in the protection of native trees.

2. Plant new saplings of this species.

3. Be a nature enthusiast. Or be a tree enthusiast to be more precise.

4. Come and visit this tree when it is naturally blooming in the spring season.

5. Go to your local nursery and obtain information about this tree.


Fast five medicinal uses about Butea monosperma

1. It is a potent astringent used in the treatment of diarrhea.

2. The seeds of Butea monosperma when mixed into a paste with honey are used for their antihelmintic, antifungal, anti-bacterial properties.

3. The seeds contain about 18% oil. Known as moodoga oil which is an effective treatment for hookworms.

4. The flowers of this tree are used in the treatment of liver disorders.

5. The flowers contain butrin and isobutrin. These combinations have been shown to have antihepatotoxic properties.


Precautions should be taken to use these herbal medicines. Don’t use these products on your own or without legal permission from authorized personnel.

The “medicinal uses” mentioned here is only for general knowledge.  Not to be applied practically without legal authorization or without being approved from the concerned field.


Thank you for reading and highlighting my work. I frequently write for trees and think about them in my happy time. Please visit my blog and do comment on my posts for offering me a little dose of encouragement that I rarely receive.


This post is originally shared on Medium. Visit this link to read more about tree stories.


Why Write For Trees?

I love encouraging people to write for trees. And there is only one valid reason for writing about trees is that they reconnect us with nature.

This image is designed by using Canva app

After nourishment, protection, and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world. Philip Pullman.

We tend to facilitate each other through the art of storytelling. So, what happens when we don’t tell stories? We die or simply lose interest in a story when it didn’t take us to an interesting place.

Trees reconnect us with nature. The problem that happened in today’s world is that we have lost the mindset of respecting trees, let alone tell stories about them.

Do you ever wonder, how can we respect trees?

It is the same as hugging a tree or not harming them in any physical way possible.

Unfortunately, trees are no longer viewed as the precious heritage of mankind.

In ancient times, there was the concept of growing trees near roadsides, or around the cottage to bring prosperity and wealth to the local community.

This credit of loving trees goes to our ancestors because of their undying respect for this planet on which we are currently living.

They displayed a tremendous amount of wisdom for trees that we don’t have. They respect trees by worshipping them. They respect trees by planting them in abundance wherever they go. They respect trees by documenting them. They respect trees by praising them and the list goes on.

A change in mindset is needed to preserve our native trees otherwise we will keep losing these trees just for our materialistic gains.

If you want to tell interesting stories about trees then the first thing you have to do is to give them due respect and credit. Here, are 14 incredible reasons why we should respect trees and adore them.

14 incredible reasons to respect trees

1. Trees play a vital role in capturing rainwater

Trees play a vital role in capturing rainwater and decreasing the risk of natural disasters like floods and landslides.

2. Trees communicate with each other

Trees communicate with each other and shared nutrients through an intricate underground web of fungi.

3. Old vs New

Scientists have found that older trees share nutrients with younger trees, which later repay them when they have evolved.

4. A mature evergreen tree

Do you know a mature evergreen tree can stop more than 15,000 liters of water every year?

5. An incredible fact about trees

It’s not a myth but an incredible fact that hospital patients with rooms close to trees happened to recover faster than those without the same view with trees.

6. Reduce stress and anxiety by connecting with trees

Trees help reduce stress and anxiety when we walk through a calm, quiet forest with a stream passing nearby.

7. Native trees help stabilize the environment

Native trees help us reconnect with nature. This is an amazing reason to love trees. Protect native trees by not cutting them down.

8. Keep alive the art of storytelling through trees

Trees have long been interlinked with the art of storytelling. Keep old ways alive by telling tales about trees.

9. An ideal backrest for reading

Trees provide the ideal backrest for reading a book or a magazine.

10. Native trees purify the air

Native trees purify the air we breathe. New research indicates that planting non-native trees hasten the rate of carbon released into the atmosphere. This is why I am in favor of planting native trees.

11. Native trees filter the water

Native trees filter the water we drink.

12. Native trees support us

Native trees take longer to grow since their tissue is denser, but they support a wide range of fauna and flora in the community.

13. Trees are an integral part of our food chain

Most native trees are also fruit-bearing and form an integral part of the food, culture, and customs of the region.

14. The history and mythology of the world revolved around trees

The history and mythology related to trees had inspired works of fiction for thousands of years. (I have read somewhere that Sara Maitland in her fascinating book, Gossip from the Forest, proposes that in ancient times the forests were both the background and the source of fairytales. Because of their mysterious secrets and silences, gifts and threats, forests were regarded as the background plot for stories such as Little red riding hood, Hansel and Gretel, and the seven dwarves)


Thank you for reading and highlighting my work. I frequently write for trees and think about them in my happy time. Please visit my blog and do comment on my posts for giving me a little dose of encouragement that I rarely receive.


29 interesting facts about Shajarat al-Hayah (Tree of life)

“As the poet said, “only God can make a tree,”
probably because it’s so hard to figure out
how to get the bark on.”

– Woody Allen

1. A lonely tree

There is a tree alone in the middle of a desert in Bahrain, that legitimately stands with its roots deep in the sand.

2. The time forgotten story of Shajarat al Hayah

This tree is locally known to us as the “Shajarat al-Hayah” and its alternative name in English is ” The Tree of Life”.

No one expected this tree to live or survive for such a long period of time, yet it has through God’s Will.

3. The king of desert

The Tree of Life in Bahrain is almost 9.75 meters (32 feet) high. It is called Shajarat al Hayat in its native Arabic language.

It has gone on thriving with the ideal height of 32 feet in the extreme temperatures and lack of freshwater resources. This is why it is known as the king of desert in many parts of the world.

4. It is over 400 years old

It is a Prosopis cineraria tree that is over 400 years old. 

It is an evergreen tree that can grow very well in a harsh climate and is well adapted to arid conditions.

5. It’s roots are 50 meters deep

Its roots are 50 meters deep, which is more than enough to reach the water.

6. The well-developed root system

The root system of this tree is long, deep and well developed, securing a firm footing and allowing it to obtain moisture from the groundwater.

7. It is a Mesquite tree

Its a mesquite tree. They may have one or multiple trunks with a multitude of branches. Its leaves are full of color with a green tint and it is remarkable for being existing for so long.

As one person explained,

“The reason people think its beautiful is because it has no right to be there.”

8. A Hardy, drought-tolerant tree

If we study the properties of this tree to understand it more comprehensively then it is quite evident that this is an extremely hardy, drought-tolerant tree because of its remarkable ability to draw water from the water table through its long taproot system.

9. Availability of water

However, it can also use water in the upper part of the ground, depending upon availability.

10. Ability to switch water resources

The tree can easily and rapidly switch from utilizing one water source to the other.

11. Native trees can grow rapidly and quickly

Mesquite trees can grow quickly and furnish shade and wildlife habitat where other trees will not grow.

12. Regeneration ability

It is also said that such a tree can even regenerate from a piece of root left in the soil.

13. A magical green spot in the desert

This tree of life is surrounded by the sea endless oilfields, and if you witness it from a distance then it appears like a magical green spot in the desert.

14. Low hanging branches to withstand hot winds and dry seasons

The tree has several low hanging branches that spread out in all directions as you can notice from various pictures of this tree. Why it is so? To easily withstand hot winds & dry seasons and shows considerable drought hardiness. 

15. It stabilizes shifting sand dunes

Because of its extensive root system, it stabilizes shifting sand dunes and is also useful as a wind-break. 

16. Folk remedies and uses of this border

It yields pale to yellow colored resin with properties similar to that of gum acacias and can be extracted which is used to make candles and aromatic gums and the seeds of this tree are processed into jams.

 17. Boosting tourism to its peak

It has gradually become a local tourist attraction and is visited by thousands of travelers every year.  

If you want to know why “the tree of life” is still surviving all alone in this oddity. Read more.

18. It is claimed that the closest water resource is about 2 kilometers away

There are many theories regarding how this tree is surviving in isolation with not any close companion. Some scientists claim that it is surviving because of the closest water source is an underground stream about 2 kilometers away.

19. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding

Others assume that it gets its water supply from the breezes from the Persian Gulf. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding.

20. Extracting water from the grains of sand

There is another claim which suggests that it has learned how to extract water from grains of sand. Quite possible.

21. It has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen fixing bacteria

It has a symbiotic relationship with some bacteria that allow it to fix nitrogen in the soil. Hence, improving soil fertility and quality.

22. This area was once considered as the Garden of Eden

According to local inhabitants, there is a belief that this area was once considered as the Garden of Eden. And this myth verifies how the ancient inhabitants started naming it as the tree of life.

23. It is claimed that this tree is protected by Enki, known as a god of water

There are also some decorative beliefs revolving around this Tree of Life. One of them says that the area was once the Garden of Eden, and the tree is growing by some mystical blessing. It is also claimed that it is protected by Enki, a god of water according to the Babylonian and Sumerian religions.

24. This tree was nominated for the New Seven Wonders of Nature

In 2009, the tree was nominated for the New seven wonders of Nature list, but it did not make it to the final.

25. Recently, 500 years old pottery was discovered in the vicinity of the tree

In October 2010, archaeologists unearthed 500-year-old pottery and other artifacts near proximity of the tree.

26. The tree of life was an Acacia planted in 1582

A soil and dendrochronology investigation accomplished in the 1990s concluded that the tree was from the family of Acacia which was planted in 1582.

27. Estimating the age of tree by ring analysis

A soil and tree ring analysis conducted now more than 20 years ago. It was made possible by historian Dr. Ali Akbar Bushiri who concluded that the Tree of Life was planted in 1582 AD.

28. It was Fenced off in 2007

It was fenced off in 2007 after being targeted by vandals. An iron fence has been put around to protect the tree from being worshipped as it is considered sacred for being rumored as to be linked to the Garden of Eden.

29. Bearing the marks of ancient civilization and the wrath of a new era

The tree bears marks of graffiti and extensive damage has been done to it’s branches by vandals and youngsters who carve love messages on it’s trunk to immortalized their love as well.

29 interesting facts about Shajarat al-Hayah (Tree of life)

“As the poet said, “only God can make a tree,”
probably because it’s so hard to figure out
how to get the bark on.”

– Woody Allen

1. A lonely tree

There is a tree alone in the middle of a desert in Bahrain, that legitimately stands with its roots deep in the sand.

2. The time forgotten story of Shajarat al Hayah

This tree is locally known to us as the “Shajarat al-Hayah” and its alternative name in English is ” The Tree of Life”.

No one expected this tree to live or survive for such a long period of time, yet it has through God’s Will.

3. The king of desert

The Tree of Life in Bahrain is almost 9.75 meters (32 feet) high. It is called Shajarat al Hayat in its native Arabic language.

It has gone on thriving with the ideal height of 32 feet in the extreme temperatures and lack of freshwater resources. This is why it is known as the king of desert in many parts of the world.

4. It is over 400 years old

It is a Prosopis cineraria tree that is over 400 years old. 

It is an evergreen tree that can grow very well in a harsh climate and is well adapted to arid conditions.

5. It’s roots are 50 meters deep

Its roots are 50 meters deep, which is more than enough to reach the water.

6. The well-developed root system

The root system of this tree is long, deep and well developed, securing a firm footing and allowing it to obtain moisture from the groundwater.

7. It is a Mesquite tree

Its a mesquite tree. They may have one or multiple trunks with a multitude of branches. Its leaves are full of color with a green tint and it is remarkable for being existing for so long.

As one person explained,

“The reason people think its beautiful is because it has no right to be there.”

8. A Hardy, drought-tolerant tree

If we study the properties of this tree to understand it more comprehensively then it is quite evident that this is an extremely hardy, drought-tolerant tree because of its remarkable ability to draw water from the water table through its long taproot system.

9. Availability of water

However, it can also use water in the upper part of the ground, depending upon availability.

10. Ability to switch water resources

The tree can easily and rapidly switch from utilizing one water source to the other.

11. Native trees can grow rapidly and quickly

Mesquite trees can grow quickly and furnish shade and wildlife habitat where other trees will not grow.

12. Regeneration ability

It is also said that such a tree can even regenerate from a piece of root left in the soil.

13. A magical green spot in the desert

This tree of life is surrounded by the sea endless oilfields, and if you witness it from a distance then it appears like a magical green spot in the desert.

14. Low hanging branches to withstand hot winds and dry seasons

The tree has several low hanging branches that spread out in all directions as you can notice from various pictures of this tree. Why it is so? To easily withstand hot winds & dry seasons and shows considerable drought hardiness. 

15. It stabilizes shifting sand dunes

Because of its extensive root system, it stabilizes shifting sand dunes and is also useful as a wind-break. 

16. Folk remedies and uses of this border

It yields pale to yellow colored resin with properties similar to that of gum acacias and can be extracted which is used to make candles and aromatic gums and the seeds of this tree are processed into jams.

 17. Boosting tourism to its peak

It has gradually become a local tourist attraction and is visited by thousands of travelers every year.  

If you want to know why “the tree of life” is still surviving all alone in this oddity. Read more.

18. It is claimed that the closest water resource is about 2 kilometers away

There are many theories regarding how this tree is surviving in isolation with not any close companion. Some scientists claim that it is surviving because of the closest water source is an underground stream about 2 kilometers away.

19. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding

Others assume that it gets its water supply from the breezes from the Persian Gulf. By absorbing moisture from the surrounding.

20. Extracting water from the grains of sand

There is another claim which suggests that it has learned how to extract water from grains of sand. Quite possible.

21. It has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen fixing bacteria

It has a symbiotic relationship with some bacteria that allow it to fix nitrogen in the soil. Hence, improving soil fertility and quality.

22. This area was once considered as the Garden of Eden

According to local inhabitants, there is a belief that this area was once considered as the Garden of Eden. And this myth verifies how the ancient inhabitants started naming it as the tree of life.

23. It is claimed that this tree is protected by Enki, known as a god of water

There are also some decorative beliefs revolving around this Tree of Life. One of them says that the area was once the Garden of Eden, and the tree is growing by some mystical blessing. It is also claimed that it is protected by Enki, a god of water according to the Babylonian and Sumerian religions.

24. This tree was nominated for the New Seven Wonders of Nature

In 2009, the tree was nominated for the New seven wonders of Nature list, but it did not make it to the final.

25. Recently, 500 years old pottery was discovered in the vicinity of the tree

In October 2010, archaeologists unearthed 500-year-old pottery and other artifacts near proximity of the tree.

26. The tree of life was an Acacia planted in 1582

A soil and dendrochronology investigation accomplished in the 1990s concluded that the tree was from the family of Acacia which was planted in 1582.

27. Estimating the age of tree by ring analysis

A soil and tree ring analysis conducted now more than 20 years ago. It was made possible by historian Dr. Ali Akbar Bushiri who concluded that the Tree of Life was planted in 1582 AD.

28. It was Fenced off in 2007

It was fenced off in 2007 after being targeted by vandals. An iron fence has been put around to protect the tree from being worshipped as it is considered sacred for being rumored as to be linked to the Garden of Eden.

29. Bearing the marks of ancient civilization and the wrath of a new era

The tree bears marks of graffiti and extensive damage has been done to it’s branches by vandals and youngsters who carve love messages on it’s trunk to immortalized their love as well.


Thank you for reading and highlighting my work. I frequently write for trees and think about them in my happy time. Please visit my blog and do comment on my posts for giving me a little dose of encouragement that I rarely receive.