15 incredible photos of the trees around the world!

Today, I am not going to talk anything about bridges or mountains or the sky full of showery clouds. There is always hope at the beginning of cultivating new things. I am talking about trees in their most glorifying form. Let’s talk about the most spectacular living component of our natural world.

Trees, trees, and trees everywhere of different shapes and sizes to maintain a balance in the ecosystem.

“A tree is known by its fruit; a man by his deeds.  A good deed is never lost; he who sows courtesy
reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love.”
–   Basil

I recently came to know about a very heartbreaking story shared by a concerned citizen from my home country that people in his neighbourhood are intended to kill a 150 years old banyan tree because it produced too much foliage and hence creating a mess of fallen leaves everywhere. It’s shocking to hear such ridiculous stories where people are mercilessly killing trees for some extra amount of cash.

(Here, a link to this Facebook post)

Trees help to strengthen a balance in the ecosystem. It is rightly said that trees are sanctuaries and have the power to enrich our souls throughout the year. They reassure and calm us down by the mere rustling of their leaves.

“Trees are sanctuaries.  Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth.  They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.” –  Hermann Hesse,  Wandering  

Unfortunately, the rate at which these trees are being cut down is very frightening in my country of origin. I don’t like tragic endings but chopping down an old tree that is also more than 150 years old is a crime in itself.

However, some of the giant old trees are difficult to forget or hard to go unnoticed. Here, I am compiling a list of 15 different types of trees around the world for you to cherish and admire.

“Follow the wisdom provided by nature. Everything in moderation – sunlight, water, nutrients. Too much of a good thing will topple your structure.  You can’t harvest what you don’t sow. So plant your desires, gently nurture them, and they will be rewarded with abundance.”

–  Vivian Elisabeth Glyck, 1997

These are the 15 most seen photos of the trees online that have been continually been shared on various social media platforms. Some people have personally visited these places to take us back to the wilderness.

The first on my list is a tree from Pakistan which has beautifully embedded herself on the wall of a neglected building.

1. That one tree struggles to revive the old heritage


2. Yes, we are talking about the roots here!


3. When mother nature thrives back


4. The Bristlecone pine tree on the rim of the Crater lake, National park, Oregon, USA


5. One of the oldest living beings in Portugal


6. This happens when the tree decides to start a new life


7. The Dragon blood tree as photographed by Daniel Kordan


8. Desert Rose is pink in colour!


9. The world oldest Olive tree, estimated to be over 3000 years old. It is still producing olives on the isle of Crete.


10. The world-famous tree house (Believe it or not). Let’s go there!


11. Arashiyama Bamboo forest is breathtaking!


12. The woods are full of fairies!
The trees are all alive!


13: Elephant paw tree in bloom


14. The daisugi technique – an ancient Japanese pruning method from the 14th century that allows lumber production without cutting down trees


15: 1400-year-old Ginkgo tree


Source: I took these images from various Facebook groups which are mostly focused on trees.


Thank you for reading. Please like, share and comment if you like this post of 15 incredible photos of the trees around the world.


I am most alive among the tall trees!

“A tree is our most intimate contact with nature.” ― George Nakashima

Tree quote: Learn character from trees

Tree quote

Learn character from trees, values from roots, and change from leaves.

by Tasneem Hameed

Happy reading.

A billboard lovely as a tree

A quote about trees by Ogden Nash

“I think that I shall never see
A billboard lovely as a tree.
Perhaps, unless the billboards fall,
I’ll never see a tree at all.”
–   Ogden Nash, Song of the Open Road, 1933    

Thank you for reading.

Quotes about understanding the wisdom of trees

Understanding the mother earth is the most challenging thing a person can endure in today’s world. To early man, trees were objects of awe and wonder. Perhaps, this is the reason for worshipping them. The mystery of their growth, the movement of their leaves and branches, the way they seemed to die and come again to life in spring used to the marvel of nature. The sudden growth of the plant from the seed – all these considered being miracles as indeed.


15 inspiring quotes on trees

Here is the compilation of some inspiring quotes about understanding the true meaning of planting trees in your vicinity.


1.The best friend on earth of man is the tree: when we use the tree respectfully and economically we have one of the greatest resources of the earth.”
– Frank Lloyd Wright


2. “A man has made at least a start on discovering the meaning of human life when he plants shade trees under which he knows full well he will never sit.”
– Elton Trueblood (1900-1994)


3. “I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast”
– Joyce Kilmer, Trees


4. “We must protect the forests for our children, grandchildren and children yet to be born. We must protect the forests for those who can’t speak for themselves such as the birds, animals, fish and trees.”
– Chief Edward Moody, Qwatsinas, Nuxalk Nation


5. “Someone’s sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.”
– Warren Buffett


6. “Approaching a tree we approach a sacred being who can teach us about love and about endless giving. She is one of millions of beings who provide our air, our homes, our fuel, our books. Working with the spirit of the tree can bring us renewed energy, powerful inspiration, deep communion.”

– Druid Tree Lore, Ovate Grade lecture


7. “Today I have grown taller from walking with the trees.”
– Karle Wilson Baker


8. “Let the trees be consulted before you take any action
every time you breathe in thank a tree
let tree roots crack parking lots at the world bank headquarters
let loggers be druids specially trained and rewarded
to sacrifice trees at auspicious times
let carpenters be master artisans
let lumber be treasured like gold
let chainsaws be played like saxophones
let soldiers on maneuvers plant trees give police and criminals a shovel
and a thousand seedlings
let businessmen carry pocketfuls of acorns
let newlyweds honeymoon in the woods
walk don’t drive
stop reading newspapers
stop writing poetry
squat under a tree and tell stories.”

– John Wright


9. “A tree uses what comes its way to nurture itself. By sinking its roots deeply into the earth, by accepting the rain that flows towards it, by reaching out to the sun, the tree perfects its character and becomes great. … Absorb, absorb, absorb. That is the secret of the tree.”

– Deng Ming-Dao, Everyday Tao, 1996, p. 18.


10. “What does he plant who plants a tree?
He plants the friend of sun and sky;
He plants the flag of breezes free;
The shaft of beauty, towering high;
He plants a home to heaven anigh
For song and mother-croon of bird
In hushed and happy twilight heard –
The treble of heaven’s harmony
These things he plants who plants a tree.”

– Henry Cuyler Bunner, The Heart of the Tree


11. “Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth.”

– Herman Hesse


12. “The poetry of the earth is never dead.”
–  John Keats 


13. “A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.”

– Franklin D. Roosevelt


14. “I refuse to have an emotional attachment to a piece of ground. At one end of the scale it’s called patriotism, at the other end of the scale it’s called gardening.” – Bob Shaw
15. “If a tree dies, plant another in its place.”
– Linnaeus  

Happy reading to you! You can participate here by sharing your favourite quote about trees here as well.

A doorway to a new world

“Between every two pines is a doorway to a new world.”

― John Muir


Five common facts about Pines

1. The pine is a modern English name derived from the Latin word pinus. Before the 19th century, pines were often referred to as firs.

2. Pines are long-lived and typically reach ages of 100–1,000 years, some even more.

3. The longest-lived Pine tree is the Great Basin bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva.

4. Pine trees are evergreen, coniferous resinous trees.

5. Pines are often featured in art, painting and fine art, drawing, photography, or folk art.


Thank you for reading.

Keeping an appointment with a beech tree

A quote about trees by Henry David.

“I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.”
–  Henry David Thoreau,  1817 – 1862  

Thank you for reading.

The oldest living thing

 

“The oldest living thing in existence is not a giant redwood, but a bristlecone pine in the White Mountains of California, dated to be aged 4,600 years old.”

–  Plants and Botany Trivia 

 

Don’t be afraid to start over

Don’t be afraid to start over. This time you’re not starting from scratch, you’re starting from experience.

Unknown

To walk under a huge banyan tree

Love for trees is a biological process and as long as we are alive, the longing for staying close to nature resides within us in various forms and shapes. I feel great affection for trees because they represent age and beauty along with the countless blessings of life and growth.

Here, I would like to excerpt a fascinating story about a man lasting love for trees from the city of Lahore that I have read about a decade ago. I read it from an online newspaper source by the name Daily Times. The purpose of sharing this story is to realize the importance of trees in our folklore and traditions.

Trees are an integral and valuable part of our natural and cultural heritage.  When we even look at our history, our literature and poetry, our music and art, we discover trees as a fundamental element of our identity and expression.  

This story as narrated by Abdul Hameed who was a renowned novelist and short story writer of his time. He was also particularly remembered for writing a prominent children’s TV play Ainak Wala Jin for Pakistan Television Corporation which used to broadcast on PTV during the mid-1990s.

Abdul Hameed used to write a column every week based on his memories of old Lahore in a very pleasant and storytelling style. He started writing a column for Daily Times newspaper on a weekly basis in his native Urdu language. His recollections of old Lahore in the mid-1950s or early years of independence (as we called this a golden era) should be appreciated greatly because of the fact that such proactive writing is rare in our literature. Moreover, we should also not forget the exceptional work of Khalid Hasan who is the person behind the translation of these masterpieces into English without losing any of the original composition and rhythm.

This story is about an undying love for Banayan Trees. It is believed that between two banayan trees lies a doorway to a new world or heaven.

There are two ways to read this story either by browsing here or by purchasing this book of 266 pages from any reliable sources that you usually prefer such as

LAHORE LAHORE AYE: Lahore radio’s lovesick trees
By A Hamid

(As narrated by Abdul Hamid in his weekly column for Daily Times and willingly translated into English by Khalid Hassan.)

I was associated with the Lahore radio station for close to forty-five years as a staff artist. My friendships were mostly with singers, composers and instrumentalists.

Those radio years gave me the opportunity to get to know artists who had few, if any, equals.

They were such nice people also, seldom asking anyone to share their burdens, which were considerable.

They were people of such childlike simplicity that even minor things would make them happy.

They were also very tender-hearted and sometimes a single note of music would bring tears to their eyes.

The famous sarangi player, I remember was Ustad Ghulam Muhammad of Kasur, who had accompanied some of the most famous classical singers of those times.

He would always accompany Lahore’s great classical vocalist Ustad Kalay Khan. In his later years, he had come to be associated with the Lahore radio station, which afforded me an opportunity to observe him closely.

He was thickset and his hair had disappeared except over his temples. He had a peculiar walk, weighted somewhat to one side.

The station had moved into its new building by now. Behind the canteen, they had set up the central production unit and the recording studios where classical, semi-classical and Punjabi folk music was recorded.

The musicians associated with the central production unit were a separate group, and they included Ustad Ghulam Muhammad.

He would also, when needed, provide accompaniment to performances being broadcast or recorded for the main station.

To go from the central production unit to the main station, you had to walk under a huge banyan tree.

Ustad Ghulam Muhammad would always look up at the tree’s thick branches when passing under it.

There was another banyan tree facing the engineering rooms, which was not so thick-leafed as the big one.

The two trees were a hundred, maybe, a hundred and fifty yards apart.

“Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness.” Herman Hesse

Ustad Ghulam Muhammad once said, as we sat in the canteen sipping tea, that the tree next to the central production unit was female and the one facing the engineering rooms was male.

“When the wind blows, that is when the two of them make contact. They are very much in love with each other,” he told us. We loved his childlike talk – a hallmark of the Ustad’s personality.

It so happened that the engineering people decided to build a few more rooms but this could only be done if the smaller banyan tree was chopped down.

Little did they know or care about male and female trees and so they sent for men who began to hack the tree down.

When Ustad Ghulam Muhammad learnt what was going on, he rushed to the chief engineer’s office, begging him not to bring down the tree.

He argued that if this tree, which was a male was cut down, someone would lose his life. But he failed to convince him.

The tree was brought down and construction got underway. I witnessed all that with much sadness.

Now whenever Ustad Ghulam Muhammad would pass under the remaining tree, he would look up and say, “Its mate is dead; this one is not going to survive long.”

While the tree did not die, Ustad Ghulam Muhammad did.

It happened one day when he was walking under the lone tree. He shuddered, fell to the ground in a heap and died.

Love is like a tree, it grows of its own accord, it puts down deep roots into our whole being.” ― Victor Hugo

The symbolization of Banayan tree in relation to this story

“A tree which has lost its head will never recover it again, and will survive only as a monument of the ignorance and folly of its Tormentor.”
– George William Curtis

Love for trees is a natural process and as long as we are alive, the longing for staying close to nature resides within us in many forms and shapes. I feel great affection for trees because they will teach us what we cannot learn from all the educators of the world.

While the tree did not die, Ustad Ghulam Muhammad did.

It’s indeed a heartbreaking story of a man profound commitment for trees and how he cared for them and worried about their protection when he used to walk under the shade of these trees.

That banayan tree did not die because of the fact that it represents longevity and immortality in South Asian culture. It has a notorious attitude of surviving for centuries regardless of its surroundings.

It is believed that between two banayan trees lies a doorway to a new world or heaven. This is because of the fact that banyan tree in our culture represents eternal life and everlastingness.

To walk under a huge banyan tree

Love for trees is a biological process and as long as we are alive, the longing for staying close to nature resides within us in various forms and shapes. I feel great affection for trees because they represent age and beauty along with the countless blessings of life and growth.

Here, I would like to excerpt a fascinating story about a man lasting love for trees from the city of Lahore that I have read about a decade ago. I read it from an online newspaper source by the name Daily Times. The purpose of sharing this story is to realize the importance of trees in our folklore and traditions.

Trees are an integral and valuable part of our natural and cultural heritage.  When we even look at our history, our literature and poetry, our music and art, we discover trees as a fundamental element of our identity and expression.  

This story as narrated by Abdul Hameed who was a renowned novelist and short story writer of his time. He was also particularly remembered for writing a prominent children’s TV play Ainak Wala Jin for Pakistan Television Corporation which used to broadcast on PTV during the mid-1990s.

Abdul Hameed used to write a column every week based on his memories of old Lahore in a very pleasant and storytelling style. He started writing a column for Daily Times newspaper on a weekly basis in his native Urdu language. His recollections of old Lahore in the mid-1950s or early years of independence (as we called this a golden era) should be appreciated greatly because of the fact that such proactive writing is rare in our literature. Moreover, we should also not forget the exceptional work of Khalid Hasan who is the person behind the translation of these masterpieces into English without losing any of the original composition and rhythm.

This story is about an undying love for Banayan Trees. It is believed that between two banayan trees lies a doorway to a new world or heaven.

There are two ways to read this story either by browsing here or by purchasing this book of 266 pages from any reliable sources that you usually prefer such as

LAHORE LAHORE AYE: Lahore radio’s lovesick trees
By A Hamid

(As narrated by Abdul Hamid in his weekly column for Daily Times and willingly translated into English by Khalid Hassan.)

I was associated with the Lahore radio station for close to forty-five years as a staff artist. My friendships were mostly with singers, composers and instrumentalists.

Those radio years gave me the opportunity to get to know artists who had few, if any, equals.

They were such nice people also, seldom asking anyone to share their burdens, which were considerable.

They were people of such childlike simplicity that even minor things would make them happy.

They were also very tender-hearted and sometimes a single note of music would bring tears to their eyes.

The famous sarangi player, I remember was Ustad Ghulam Muhammad of Kasur, who had accompanied some of the most famous classical singers of those times.

He would always accompany Lahore’s great classical vocalist Ustad Kalay Khan. In his later years, he had come to be associated with the Lahore radio station, which afforded me an opportunity to observe him closely.

He was thickset and his hair had disappeared except over his temples. He had a peculiar walk, weighted somewhat to one side.

The station had moved into its new building by now. Behind the canteen, they had set up the central production unit and the recording studios where classical, semi-classical and Punjabi folk music was recorded.

The musicians associated with the central production unit were a separate group, and they included Ustad Ghulam Muhammad.

He would also, when needed, provide accompaniment to performances being broadcast or recorded for the main station.

To go from the central production unit to the main station, you had to walk under a huge banyan tree.

Ustad Ghulam Muhammad would always look up at the tree’s thick branches when passing under it.

There was another banyan tree facing the engineering rooms, which was not so thick-leafed as the big one.

The two trees were a hundred, maybe, a hundred and fifty yards apart.

“Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness.” Herman Hesse

Ustad Ghulam Muhammad once said, as we sat in the canteen sipping tea, that the tree next to the central production unit was female and the one facing the engineering rooms was male.

“When the wind blows, that is when the two of them make contact. They are very much in love with each other,” he told us. We loved his childlike talk – a hallmark of the Ustad’s personality.

It so happened that the engineering people decided to build a few more rooms but this could only be done if the smaller banyan tree was chopped down.

Little did they know or care about male and female trees and so they sent for men who began to hack the tree down.

When Ustad Ghulam Muhammad learnt what was going on, he rushed to the chief engineer’s office, begging him not to bring down the tree.

He argued that if this tree, which was a male was cut down, someone would lose his life. But he failed to convince him.

The tree was brought down and construction got underway. I witnessed all that with much sadness.

Now whenever Ustad Ghulam Muhammad would pass under the remaining tree, he would look up and say, “Its mate is dead; this one is not going to survive long.”

While the tree did not die, Ustad Ghulam Muhammad did.

It happened one day when he was walking under the lone tree. He shuddered, fell to the ground in a heap and died.

Love is like a tree, it grows of its own accord, it puts down deep roots into our whole being.” ― Victor Hugo

The symbolization of Banayan tree in relation to this story

“A tree which has lost its head will never recover it again, and will survive only as a monument of the ignorance and folly of its Tormentor.”
– George William Curtis

Love for trees is a natural process and as long as we are alive, the longing for staying close to nature resides within us in many forms and shapes. I feel great affection for trees because they will teach us what we cannot learn from all the educators of the world.

While the tree did not die, Ustad Ghulam Muhammad did.

It’s indeed a heartbreaking story of a man profound commitment for trees and how he cared for them and worried about their protection when he used to walk under the shade of these trees.

That banayan tree did not die because of the fact that it represents longevity and immortality in South Asian culture. It has a notorious attitude of surviving for centuries regardless of its surroundings.

It is believed that between two banayan trees lies a doorway to a new world or heaven. This is because of the fact that banyan tree in our culture represents eternal life and everlastingness.


Thank you for reading and highlighting my work. I frequently write for trees and think about them in my happy time. Please visit my blog and do comment on my posts for giving me a little dose of encouragement that I rarely receive.